Found 469 results matching 'nuffield'

Not found what you’re looking for? Try using double quote marks to search for a specific whole word or phrase, try a different search filter on the left, or see our search tips.

  • Teaching history's big pictures: including continuity as well as change

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. School history teachers are not the only ones wrestling with the challenges of building ‘big pictures' that do justice to complexity. In this article, social and cultural historian Penelope Corfield puts our interest in long-term...
    Teaching history's big pictures: including continuity as well as change
  • Young Quills Awards 2016 – Winners and Reviews

      Multipage Article
    The Young Quills awards are presented annually by the HA for best historical fiction for young and youth readers released in the previous year. The final decision of the winners is selected by an adult judging panel who are interested in the historical accuracy and presentation as well as by the...
    Young Quills Awards 2016 – Winners and Reviews
  • General workshop resources – HA Conference 2015

      Multipage Article
    The resources in this section are from the general history lectures and workshops presented at the HA Annual Conference 2015 in Bristol. The HA Annual Conference is a unique opportunity to join the history community on a weekend of engaging history. In the General pathway you can enjoy lectures from academic researchers...
    General workshop resources – HA Conference 2015
  • The Victorian Age

      Classic Pamphlet
    This Classic Pamphlet was published in 1937 (the centenary of the accession of Queen Victoria, who succeeded to the throne on June 20, 1837). Synopsis of contents: 1. Is the Victorian Age a distinct 'period' of history? Landmarks establishing its beginning: the Reform Bill, railways, other inventions, new leaders in...
    The Victorian Age
  • Using the back cover image: Oxford Street in the 1960s

      Primary History feature
    Photographs are very useful and productive documents when teaching history. They provide a snapshot of the past such as this one from just outside Selfridges on Oxford Street in London c.1962-64. Combined with further images from Heritage Explorer, clips from Pathé News, extracts from the 1911 Census, locally gathered images...
    Using the back cover image: Oxford Street in the 1960s
  • Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer

      Article
    John Painter explores a strategically-important French boundary town, over which neighbouring powers have competed for over 1,200 years. Montreuil in Picardy is one of the most interesting small towns in northern France and a good base for visiting the battlefields of Crécy and Agincourt as well as the Somme Western...
    Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer
  • Bristol and the Slave Trade

      Classic Pamphlet
    Captain Thomas Wyndham of Marshfield Park in Somerset was on voyage to Barbary where he sailed from Kingroad, near Bristol, with three ships full of goods and slaves thus beginning the association of African Trade and Bristol. In the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Bristol was not a place of...
    Bristol and the Slave Trade
  • The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars

      Article
    Scum of the earth – or fine fellows? Carole Divall asks whether the men of the British Army really were ‘the scum of the earth’, as often asserted, or willing soldiers who earned the respect of the French. ‘Soldiers were regarded as day labourers engaged in unsavoury business; a money...
    The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars
  • The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815

      Article
    John Morewood explores the events of 18 June 1815 in detail and asks just how accurate is our view of what happened on the field of Waterloo. Summary Waterloo is the most famous battle in a four-battle campaign fought from 15 June to 19 June 1815. On one side were...
    The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815
  • The Historian 126: The Battle of Waterloo

      The magazine of the Historical Association
    4 Reviews 5 Editorial 6 The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815 - John Morewood (Read Article) 13 News from 59a 14 Scum of the earth - or fine fellows? The British soldier in theRevolutionary and Napoleonic wars - Carole Divall (Read Article) 19 The President's Column 20 Medical aspects...
    The Historian 126: The Battle of Waterloo
  • 1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘When Kings and chief officers suffer their under rulers to misuse their subjects and will not hear nor remedy their people's wrongs when they complain, then suffereth God the rebel to rage and to execute that part of His justice which the partial prince will not.' Thus did the Tudor...
    1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade
  • Teaching History 158 - A Grounding in History

      The HA's journal for secondary history teachers
    02 Editorial 03 HA Secondary News 04 HA Update 08 Andrew Stacey-Chapman - From a compartmentalised to a complicated past: developing transferable knowledge at A-level (Read article) 16 Cunning Plan - Tony McConnell (Read article) 18 Dominik Palek - 'What exactly is parliament?' Finding the place of substantive knowledge in...
    Teaching History 158 - A Grounding in History
  • Polychronicon 158: Reinterpreting Napoleon

      Article
    On 18 June 2015, the two-hundredth anniversary of the great battle of Waterloo will be commemorated in Britain and on the continent (though not in France). It will represent the climax of the Napoleonic bicentenary, which has been in full flow since the turn of the twenty-first century. Fresh biographies...
    Polychronicon 158: Reinterpreting Napoleon
  • Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust

      Article
    International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research [IJHLTR], Volume 14, Number 2 – Spring/Summer 2017 ISSN: 14472-9474 Abstract In this article I seek to encourage those involved in Holocaust education in schools to engage not just with the Holocaust but also with its aftermath. I conceptualise the latter in terms of two...
    Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • Polychronicon 157: Reinterpreting police-public relations in modern England

      Article
    The relationship between the police and the public has long been a key subject in English social history. The formative work in this field was conducted between the 1970s and 1990s, but the past few years have witnessed something of a revival of research in the area. By focusing on...
    Polychronicon 157: Reinterpreting police-public relations in modern England
  • On British Soil: Hartlepool, 16 December, 1914

      Article
    Heugh Battery, a Victorian survivor, received a new lease of life in 1908 when introduction of an improved Vickers 6-inch Mark VII gun greatly added to earlier, far less telling firepower. The Victorian pile was refurbished two years later and a pair of the new cannon installed. In 1907, the...
    On British Soil: Hartlepool, 16 December, 1914
  • The Historian 122: French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?

      The magazine of the Historical Association
    5 Editorial 6 French chivalry in twelfth century Britain? - John Gillingham (Read Article) 11 The President's Column 12 D-Day Commemorations the last big year to remember? - Paula Kitching and Jon Wort (Read Article) 19 Bayeux - Edward Towne (Read Article) 20 ‘Veni, Vidi, Vici!' A personal reflection on Julius Caesar and...
    The Historian 122: French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?
  • French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?

      Article
    The year 1066 - the one universally remembered date in English history, so well-known that banks advise customers not to choose it as their PIN number - opened the country up to French influence in spectacular fashion. During the ‘long twelfth century' (up to King John's death in 1216) that...
    French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?
  • Teaching History 155: Teaching About WW1

      The HA's journal for secondary history teachers
    02 Editorial 03 HA Secondary News 04 HA Update 08 Rachel Foster - A world turned molten: helping Year 9 to explore the cultural legacies of the First World War (Read article) 20 Mary Brown and Carolyn Massey - Teaching ‘the lesson of satire': using The Wipers Times to build...
    Teaching History 155: Teaching About WW1
  • Using Twitter in the History Classroom

      Research Report
    This attached report is by Dave Martin on an H. A. action research project where three schools in Dorset experimented with using Twitter in their teaching of history. They used Twitter to explore multiple viewpoints from the battlefield at Hastings, to ask an author about the process of writing historical fiction,...
    Using Twitter in the History Classroom
  • The Historian 121: Historical Biography

      The magazine of the Historical Association
    3 Review - John F. Kennedy 5 Editorial 6 Anne Herbert: A life in the Wars of the Roses - Ian Dawson (Read Article) 13 The President's Column 14 Contemporary and Historical Biography: The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 2004-14: A ten-year review - Lawrence Goldman 20 The Unfortunate Captain Peirce:...
    The Historian 121: Historical Biography
  • The Unfortunate Captain Peirce

      Article
    An apprentice biographer researches the career of an eighteenth-century sea captain On a cold January afternoon in 1986, my neighbour announced that he intended to go to Dorset's Purbeck coast that night. Puzzled, I asked why. He explained it was the 200th anniversary of the wreck of the East Indiaman,...
    The Unfortunate Captain Peirce
  • Starting a new Branch

      Organising and running an HA branch
    The Historical Association and its branches Branches have been an essential part of the Historical Association since it began. They exist in all parts of the United Kingdom and take a variety of forms. A branch provides a local forum to bring together all those with an interest in history:...
    Starting a new Branch
  • The Early Mediaeval State

      Classic Pamphlet
    In order to define the constitution of a state, theorists and historians still apply Aristotle's categories; monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy. This method has obvious limitations; there can be no doubt that the formal sovereignty either of an individual or of a minority or a majority does not of itself suffice...
    The Early Mediaeval State
  • Polychronicon 154: Elizabeth I

      Teaching History feature
    Elizabeth I is admired today for her power dressing and her power portraits; her political acumen and her success in a man's world. The adulation of Elizabeth started during her own lifetime when she was praised as a goddess and even as a celestial power. Elizabeth's semi-mythical status is reflected...
    Polychronicon 154: Elizabeth I