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  • Camels, diamonds and counterfactuals: a model for teaching causal reasoning

      Teaching History article
    In the last edition of Teaching History, Arthur Chapman described how he uses ICT to develop sixth form students’ conceptual understanding of interpretations, significance and change. In this article, he turns his attention to causal reasoning and analysis. Drawing on the work of historians such as Evans and Carr, he...
    Camels, diamonds and counterfactuals: a model for teaching causal reasoning
  • Podcast: End of the World Cults

      Podcast
    In this podcast Professor Penelope Corfield looks at the history of 'End of the World Cults'.  1. Why do people at times become urgently convinced that 'the End of the World is Nigh?' HA Members can listen to the full podcast here Short Reading list for End-of-the-World Cults: Two wide-ranging introductions:...
    Podcast: End of the World Cults
  • Using this map and all your knowledge, become Bismarck

      Teaching History article
    Understanding the past is not an abstract exercise. Historical questions revolve around decisions made by real people under real pressure. As historians, we factor psychological pressure into our analysis. How, though, are we to enable our students to do the same? To study why Bismarck began a programme of overseas...
    Using this map and all your knowledge, become Bismarck
  • How studying history can help with a range of careers involved in shaping the places we live.

      History & Careers Unit 5
    Town-planning, property development, leisure and heritage industries, archaeology and museum work. Context: This idea for a short series of lessons is aimed at year 7 students who are studying either a "Who do We think We are?" unit, or, more broadly, a unit on migration and settlement in Britain. It...
    How studying history can help with a range of careers involved in shaping the places we live.
  • A most horrid malicious bloody flame: using Samuel Pepys to improve Year 8 boys' historical writing

      Teaching History article
    Unusually, instead of moving from a narrative to an analytic structure, David Waters moves his pupils from causal analysis to narrative. By the time pupils are ready to produce their storyboard narrative, their thinking about the Great Fire has been shaped and re-shaped not only by structural exercises and argument...
    A most horrid malicious bloody flame: using Samuel Pepys to improve Year 8 boys' historical writing
  • Promote the past, celebrate the present: putting your history department in the news

      Teaching History article
    Dan Collins urges history teachers to promote both their subject and their department in the local press. Drawing on his experience of a history department in a large, mixed, multi-cultural comprehensive school in West London, Dan argues that there are many opportunities available, from national anniversaries to the success of...
    Promote the past, celebrate the present: putting your history department in the news
  • Developing conceptual understanding through talk mapping

      Teaching History article
    As history teachers, we talk about concepts all the time. We know that pupils need to understand them in order to make sense of the past. Precisely what we mean when we talk about concepts is less clear, however. Research into how history teachers talk about their practice suggests that,...
    Developing conceptual understanding through talk mapping
  • 11 Ways to Use Multimedia Videos in History Lessons

      Article
    Dan Moorhouse provides: 11 ways to use multimedia videos in lessons: 1)      To develop an understanding of the ways in which different interpretations of events are formed. For example, pupils may study Cromwell and his times and may then be asked to consider how and for what purpose a particular interpretation...
    11 Ways to Use Multimedia Videos in History Lessons
  • Ensuring progression continues into GCSE: let's not do for our pupils with our plan of attack

      Teaching History article
    Dale Banham continues a theme explored by many other teacher-authors in recent years, how to ensure that progression does not just stop in Year 9, leaving pupils stagnant in key areas of historical learning before getting picked up again in Year 12. He produces a more thorough rationale and commentary...
    Ensuring progression continues into GCSE: let's not do for our pupils with our plan of attack
  • Why we must change history GCSE

      Teaching History article
    A head of steam for change in GCSE history has been building for some time now amongst history teachers, heads of history, advisers, teacher-trainers, researchers, consultants and all who regularly engage in debate about history teaching and learning. All those who read widely, share their practice, experience many Key Stage...
    Why we must change history GCSE
  • Drop the dead dictator: a Year 9 newsroom simulation

      Teaching History article
    Rosalind Stirzaker has big ambitions for her students. She wants them to do more than make a simple list of the key causes of the Second World War. Yes, she wants them to complete a piece of written work, but she wants – and gets – a great deal more...
    Drop the dead dictator: a Year 9 newsroom simulation
  • Thinking from the inside: je suis le roi

      Teaching History article
    Dale Banham and Ian Dawson show how active learning deepens students’ understanding of attitudes and reactions to the Norman Conquest. At the same time they build a bold argument for active learning, including a direct strike at the two most common objections to it. Many teachers still see it as...
    Thinking from the inside: je suis le roi
  • Have we got the question right? Engaging future citizens in local history enquiry

      Teaching History article
    Gary Clemitshaw describes a five-lesson sequence integrating history, citizenship and ICT. He examines the varied rationales and problems underlying a citizenship-history link and then argues for the role of the local dimension in securing a connection that preserves the integrity of the discipline of history. He focuses upon causation as...
    Have we got the question right? Engaging future citizens in local history enquiry
  • 'Don't worry, Mr. Trimble. We can handle it' Balancing the rationale and the emotional in teaching of contentious topics

      Teaching History article
    A common line amongst teachers and policy-makers seeking to theorise a workable relationship between history and the new subject of citizenship is to say that there must be a link with the present. This is harder than it sounds. If the implication is that the study of the past should...
    'Don't worry, Mr. Trimble. We can handle it' Balancing the rationale and the emotional in teaching of contentious topics
  • SHP and 'What is history?'

      Article
    In the 1970s a new approach to history teaching was developed through the auspices of the Schools Council History Project (SCHP) later named the Schools History Project (SHP). In order to engage pupils (and reverse the perceived danger of a declining uptake of history amongst pupils) the project authors designed...
    SHP and 'What is history?'
  • Illuminating the shadow: making progress happen in casual thinking through speaking and listening

      Article
    Here is another breath of fresh air from the Thomas Tallis history department. In TH 103, Head of Department Tony Hier showed how he developed a rigorous framework for implementing government initiatives and improving departmental professional discourse at the same time. This time, from history teacher Vaughan Clark, we get...
    Illuminating the shadow: making progress happen in casual thinking through speaking and listening
  • Welcome back to a new school year

      Information
    Welcome back to a new school year
  • You are members of a United Nations Commission...' Recent world crises simulations

      Article
    David Ghere presents a teaching and learning rationale for simulations where the location is not identified. This creates a deliberately artificial situation where the student can tackle the problems and carry out the decision-making and problem-solving exercise without preconceptions. The author does not recommend leaving the activity at this stage,...
    You are members of a United Nations Commission...' Recent world crises simulations