World

The modern world cannot be studied without examining the course, impact and legacy of two world wars, the resources in this section set out to look at both the First and Second World Wars in their global context. The section also includes the Cold War and its impact in Latin America, South-East Asia and parts of Africa. This period also sees the rise and fall of European imperialism and the changing nature of global politics and economics as technology brings different stories from so many parts of the world directly to us. Read more

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  • Comparing the Bay of Pigs Invasion and the Jameson Raid

    Article

    Duplicated Debacles? A comparison of the 1895-96 Jameson Raid and the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion. Adam Burns and Robert Gallimore take us on two invasions, one by land and one by sea. Following the Cuban Revolution of 1959 and the rise to power of the socialist regime of Fidel...

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  • D-Day, Commemorations - the last big year to remember?

    Article

    This year it was the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The world's politicians and media went into overdrive about it. The BBC dedicated a whole day to the coverage, mainly live from Normandy while small events took place around the UK. For a whole day the upcoming centenary of the First...

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  • Dean Mahomet: Travel writer, curry entrepreneur and shampooer to the King

    Article

    The National Portrait Gallery in London is home to many thousands of portraits, photographs and sculptures of the great and the good, as well as those who travelled on the darker side of history. In 2007 it hosted a small exhibition in the Porter Gallery entitled Between Worlds: Voyagers to...

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  • Diagrams in History

    Article

    One of the gifts of the social sciences to history is the use of expository diagrams; but attention is rarely given to the history of diagrams. Maps - schematized representations of locations in spatial relation to one another - can be dated back to Babylonia in the late third millennium...

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  • Drought, Dust and Despair

    Article

    World War I had traumatised Britain and gravely shaken Australia, with the young nation losing over 60,000 men to the bloodshed in Europe. With poor social conditions wracking the United Kingdom and Australia looking to boost its population and open up the more remote regions for agriculture, the seeds were...

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  • Echoes of Tsushima

    Article

    In 2005 East Asian regional strategy is once again a hot topic for policy makers, diplomats and journalists. As China begins to reassert herself regionally and as her economy revives to challenge conceptions of her place in the world, Japan, Russia, Korea (North and South) and the United States are...

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  • Eighteenth-century Britain and its Empire

    Article

    The concept of an ‘English’ or even of a ‘British’ empire has been in use at least from the sixteenth century. What the term then conveyed was of course very different from what it was to convey in modern times. By the mid-eighteenth century, however, contemporaries were beginning to envisage...

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  • Film: An Interview with Margaret MacMillan

    Multipage Article

    The HA are delighted to announce that the Medlicott Medal for 2015 has been awarded to Professor Margaret MacMillan. The Medlicott Medal is for outstanding contributions to the study and enjoyment of history. The award will be presented on Wednesday 8 July 2015 in central London, where she will also...

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  • First World War treaties and entrenchment

    Article

    Podcast and Presentation from HA Annual Conference 2014 Saturday - Session 3 - SGPK3 They won't be home for Christmas: the First World War treaties and entrenchment Paula Kitching Freelance Historian and Consultant As men around the UK and Empire rushed to recruitment centres to volunteer for a conflict that...

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  • Football and British-Soviet Relations

    Article

    Following the recent ‘Euro 96’ championship, Jim Phillips looks at two earlier international football tours which had major political and ideological connotations. In November 1945 Moscow Dynamo became the first Soviet football team to visit Britain, playing in Cardiff, Glasgow and twice in London. With English, Welsh and Scottish crowds...

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  • Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal

    Article

    New Deal is the name given to the policies of the American president Franklin D. Roosevelt during the 1930s. Elected in 1932, at a time of great economic depression, he sought to alleviate distress by using the inherent powers of government, and the New Deal era come to be seen...

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  • Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War

    Article

    Gary Sheffield, Professor of War studies, the University of Wolverhampton, is one of the UK's foremost historians on the First World War.  He is the author of numerous books and previously held posts at the University of Birmingham and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. In April 2014 he spoke at an HA event for teachers...

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  • HA Podcast: The Opium Wars

    Article

    In this podcast Dr. Yangwen Zheng of the University of Manchester looks at the origins, theatre and consequences of the Opium Wars. The Opium Wars by Dr Yangwen Zheng Tracks: 1. The origins of the First Opium War: Tea and Trade Imbalance.2. China in the 18th Century: industrialisation, a growing...

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  • Have gun, will travel: The myth of the frontier in the Hollywood Western

    Article

    The Western movies that from around 1910 until the 1960s made up at least a fifth of all the American film titles on general release signified escapist entertainment for British audiences: an alluring vision of vast open spaces, of cowboys on horseback outlined against an imposing landscape. For Americans themselves,...

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  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Introducing students to historical interpretation

    Article

    High school history teacher Brent Dyck is one of our Canadian readers. He has offered this item to The Historian as a contribution to our commitment to explore the historical approaches and values that we are seeking to convey to young people and the wider public. We hope that you may...

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  • Historical Diary: An Eighteenth-Century Gap Year

    Article

    Historical diaries written by children are rare and only seven from England and the United States written before 1800 are known to have survived. One of these, found tucked away in the London Metropolitan Archive, is the diary of William Hugh Burgess, a fifteen year-old boy who grew up in...

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  • Historical Events or People in 10 Tweets - The Crimean War

    Article

    This is a new feature summarising an event or person using ten statements of only 140 characters (including spaces!). Compiled by Paula Kitching.The Crimean WarThe Crimean War exposed the power games amongst European powers & the declining Ottoman Empire using religious upset for political advanceAfter much posturing Russia attacked Turkey...

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  • Iconic Images of War: photographs that changed history

    Article

    The recent photographs taken of US troops apparently abusing Iraqi prisoners-of-war in Abu Ghraib Jail have attracted attention across the world. Although it is too early to say whether these images will come to represent the essential character of the current Iraq conflict, they have altered public perceptions, producing doubt...

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  • Imperialism resurgent: European attempts to 'recolonise' South East Asia after 1945

    Article

    ‘To think that the people of Indochina would be content to settle for less [from the French] than Indonesia has gained from the Dutch or India from the British is to underestimate the power of the forces that are sweeping Asia today'.An American adviser in 1949 cited: Robin Jeffrey ed.,...

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  • India and the British war effort, 1939-1945

    Article

    India was vital as a source of men and material for the British in the Second World War, despite the constitutional, social and economic issues which posed threats to its contribution. Leo Amery, Secretary of State for India 1940-5, wrote to Churchill, 8 April 1941: ‘My prime care had naturally...

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