Heritage

In this section there is information and articles on heritage concerning: the professional sector; local conservation and access; the built environment and national moods and policies. Features here will be added to over time and will include information and advice on accessing the heritage sector, careers and volunteer activities.

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  • A tale of two Turings

    Article

    Among the posthumous attempts to celebrate his scientific importance, alongside recognition of the unwarranted injustices to which he was subjected, two important statues to Alan Turing are highlighted by Dave Martin. Article taken from The Historian 136

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  • A tale of two statues

    Article

    Dave Martin relates how the statue of one of our imperial ‘heroes’ prompted a campaign to have it taken down while the statue of another imperial ‘hero’ prompted a fund-raising campaign for its repair. As the tide of Empire ebbed across the globe vestiges of British rule remained, some great,...

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  • Archaeology

    Article

    The Council for British Archaeology have produced a guide to getting involved in archaeology. Across the UK there are regional community groups undertaking practical field work; there are colleges and universities offering part-time courses – all of whom are keen to hear from you. It doesn't matter where you live...

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  • Beyond the boundaries of the Lake District

    Article

    This article responds to recent changes in the size and status of the Lake District National Park by considering the historical interconnectedness of the Lake District with the region that surrounds it. Drawing on visual and verbal responses to the landscape of the Lakes region, Christopher Donaldson reveals how historical...

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  • Building St James's spire: Louth's guilds and popular piety in the later middle ages

    Article

    Medieval historian Dr Claire Kennan continued our Virtual Branch series with a local history talk on the building of St James's spire, Louth.  In her talk Kennan traces the important role that Louth's major guilds of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Holy Trinity played in the building of the St James’s spire. Throughout the...

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  • Council for British Archaeology Back Catalogue

    Article

    CBA Research Report Series ISSN 0589-9036 1 1955 Romano-British villas: some current problemsQuarto, 26pp, figures, no ISBN out of printonline 2 1955 The recording of architecture and its publicationCBA Medieval Research CommitteeQuarto, 3pp no ISBN out of printonline 3 1955 The investigation of smaller domestic buildingsCBA Post-Medieval Research CommitteeQuarto, 4pp,...

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  • England’s Saintly Landscape

    Article

    England’s Saintly Landscape, Trevor James, Lichfield Press, 2020, 95 pp, £10-00. ISBN 978-0-905985-94-7 The author is quick to credit W G Hoskins and Eilert Ekwall and their influence is readily apparent in the enthusiasm that permeates this study. Trevor James’ contention is that church dedications, place names, pilgrimage routes, local industries, fairs and...

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  • Heritage Management & Education

    Article

    1. Nottingham Trent University MA/PGCert/PGDip Museum and Heritage Management There is a need for multi-skilled, quality staff who combine a broad vision of the field in which they are working with practical expertise in the care and presentation of heritage. Their postgraduate heritage management courses combine the conceptual framework necessary...

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  • Heritage and History

    Article

    Moves to protect and record the historic environment began at the turn of the 20th century with the establishment of the National Trust in 1895, the Victoria County History in 1899, and the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments for England in 1908. The VCH took the antiquarians’ task onto a...

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  • Heritage, Museum and Gallery Education

    Article

    Heritage, Museum and Gallery Education reading list provided by Newcastle University  Essential Reading Anderson, David, A common wealth : museums and learning in the United KingdomDepartment of National Heritage, 1997 Cracknell, S. & Corbishley, M., Presenting Archaeology to Young PeopleCouncil for British Archaeology, 1986.   Henson, Donald, Archaeology in the English national...

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  • Hidden histories: landscape spotting – a brief guide

    Article

    The art of landscape spotting – identifying and interpreting visible archaeological features in the countryside – is an accessible, enlightening and fun way to explore our past. By finding these clues in the fields, roads, hedges and hills around us, we can start to piece together the biography of a...

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  • James of St George and the Castles of the Welsh Wars

    Article

    James of St George and the Castles of the Welsh Wars, Malcolm Hislop, Pen and Sword, 2020, 302p, £25-00. ISBN 9781526741301 The title of Malcom Hislop’s book tends to understate the extent of what he manages to embrace in this important volume. The role of James of St George in...

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  • My Favourite History Place - Barnard Castle

    Article

    Paula Kitching invites us to look at Barnard Castle with new eyes. Over the summer there was a lot of talk about Barnard Castle – I won’t go into the politics, but it did make me reflect on the actual town of Barnard Castle. Growing up, it was one of...

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  • My Favourite History Place: Edinburgh's Royal Mile

    Article

    Maggie Wilson whets our appetite for exploration of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile. Edinburgh’s Royal Mile runs between the Castle and Holyrood Palace. In addition to these and other well-known sites such as St Giles Cathedral, John Knox’s house, the Canongate Tolbooth and Canongate Kirk, and stories of Deacon Brodie, David Hume, James Boswell, Robert Burns and, obviously,...

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  • My Favourite History Place: Hadrian’s Wall

    Article

    Choosing Hadrian’s Wall as one of my favourite places is a bit of a cheat, really, as it is a 73-mile-long (80 Roman miles) wall punctuated with a whole range of 20 individual sites each worth a visit; from mile castles and forts to desolate sections with fabulous views or...

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  • My Favourite History Place: Keswick

    Article

    Adventure is a buzz word in the tourist trade and this old market town with under 5,000 residents advertises that it is the Lake District’s Adventure Capital. There is plenty to justify the title – the challenges of mountaineering on foot, bicycle or climbing-rope, swimming, canoeing, sailing, dragon-boat racing, hang-gliding and...

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  • My Favourite History Place: Maiden Castle

    Article

    In the six years I have been on the editorial board of The Historian I have enjoyed reading about many historians’ favourite places so it is fitting that I write my last contribution about mine. Maiden Castle  is the largest Celtic hill fort in southern Europe. I forget when I first...

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  • My Favourite History Place: Petra

    Article

    Ghislaine Headland-Vanni visits the ancient city of Petra, in Jordan. When you hear the word ‘Petra’ what images does the word conjure up for you? Maybe you have visited and know it already; if not, then like me you may not fully comprehend its size. I naively thought I could...

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  • My Favourite History Place: The Chantry Chapel of St Mary on Wakefield Bridge

    Article

    Wakefield Bridge Chapel, by the River Calder, is thought by many to be the finest of four bridge chantries, the others being Bradford-on-Avon, Derby and Rotherham. The chapel at Wakefield was originally founded and endowed by the people of Wakefield and district between 1342 and 1359. In 1397 Edmund de Langley,...

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  • My Favourite History Place: The Guild Chapel

    Article

    Trevor James highlights a very important building to visit and celebrate during the HA's Annual Conference in Stratford-upon-Avon in May 2018. Article taken from The Historian 136

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