Classroom Resources

The HA has spent a great deal of effort in developing resonant support for the Key Stage 2 curriculum. Most you will find here, especially the articles and reviews from Primary History. Read more

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  • Using the back cover image: painted wooden police truncheon

    Article

    This painted wooden police truncheon dates from the reign of King William IV (1830–37). It is decorated with a crown and the letters WIVR, standing for King William IV. For some pupils, its function may be obvious, for others it may be mistaken for a rounders or baseball bat, or...

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  • Using apps in the history curriculum

    Article

    There are a lot of apps out there on multiple platforms and searching for ‘History’ does not really narrow anything down. Knowing which ones are useful, usable and worth paying for is often a case of trial and error. However, this list will save you trawling through the myriad of...

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  • The history of medicine – warts and all – for Key Stage 2

    Article

    The story of the history of medicine is HUGE! In fact, it’s a story within story within a story… You only have to note the substantial amounts that have been written on the subject in the past, to realise that this is a story that could baffle and perplex even...

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  • Ordinary Roman life

    Article

    How do we make connections with past lives through authentic artefacts? My research evidence suggests that pupils do not really like having to imagine they are an evacuee or a Roman (for example), but do like engaging with and thinking about the reality of past lives. It has been surprising...

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  • Women in parliament since 1918

    Article

    At the 1918 election just one woman, Constance Markievicz, won a seat, in Dublin, for Sinn Fein. She was in prison at the time. At the time, of course, the whole of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. All 73 Sinn Fein MPs refused to take up their seats, and...

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  • Using the back cover image: Moustache cup

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 The moustache cup I purchased on ebay is one of the most popular artefacts I use with students in a good game of ‘guess the object’. It has a wonderful quality of being at the same time familiar yet strange. Despite telling the students not to...

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  • ‘So why did they go into hiding?’ Anne Frank in her historical and social context

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 All too often Anne Frank becomes a symbol, used to show ‘the triumph of hope over evil’, even though she was killed during the Holocaust. Sometimes she is quoted utterly out of context to provide uplifting sentiments, or short phrases with redemptive messages.  What this lesson sets out...

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  • World War I: widening relevance in the modern world

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 Hayyan Bhabha introduces a project that is using newly-discovered documents to show the contribution of Allied Muslim soldiers in the First World War, with the aim of developing empathy, mutual respect and religious understanding in young children of all ages. At a time of rising nationalism across the...

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  • Pull-out Posters: Primary History 76

    Article

    1. Communication Across the Ages; 2. The British Museum's Sutton Hoo Helmet

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Refugee stories

    Article

    An assembly could focus on the achievements of their lives, experiences as child refugees and migrants, and how they overcame their difficulties. Their stories can be compared and contrasted with other refugees, such as children from the Kindertransport and child refugees in Europe today. It is important that children understand the term ‘refugee’...

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  • Overground, underground and across the sea

    Article

    Communication is at the heart of what it is to be human, and the British postal service has helped to shape the modern world as we know it today. From cryptic Victorian Valentine cards to a lion encountered on Salisbury Plain, there is nothing ordinary about the story of the post! The British postal service...

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  • What confuses primary children in history...

    Article

    Young children who automatically see shiny things as new no matter what their age, those who mix up technology from one age with another, those who dismiss people in the past as stupid because they did not have the possessions we have today, those who equate the age of a...

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  • Anglo-Saxon Women

    Article

    The Anglo-Saxon era is a diverse period that stretches across just over 650 years. Those we call Anglo-Saxons were not homogenous nor were their experiences. In AD 410 the Roman legions leave and the first Anglo-Saxon raiders appear. These pagan warrior bands would come to terrorise Romano-British settlements until, inevitably,...

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  • Using the back cover image: Mummified cat

    Article

    For hundreds of years, travellers to Egypt have marvelled at the amazing monuments evident throughout the country. The treasures of Ancient Egypt became more fascinating after  the discovery of the Rosetta stone in 1799, which led to the deciphering of the hieroglyphic language. Many Victorian explorers returned to their European...

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  • Studying the Maya

    Article

    Most pupils like history, but some struggle with aspects of reading and writing – how can we make history more accessible? This article explores some ways I have found useful in engaging pupils of all abilities. It will focus on activities that might be used in studying the Non-European Society...

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  • What made Cleopatra so special?

    Article

    Ancient Egyptian civilisation is rich and mysterious with distinctive visual imagery and strange animal-headed gods. The exotic differences of the society have always intrigued the western imagination and so they continue to ensure that this is a popular unit with both teachers and children. There are plentiful resources with new...

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  • Celebrate your sporting heritage

    Article

    National Sporting Heritage Day takes place on 30 September every year. It aims to support schools and other community organisations to engage withtheir local sporting heritage, explore the heritage on their doorstep, celebrate and share the information that they find and inspire children and young people to find out more....

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  • Using original sources

    Article

    It has always been recognised that good primary history is able to connect the past with the world the children currently inhabit. That is why focusing on schools can be so useful. If there is one experience the children have definitely had, it is experiencing school life, so there are...

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  • So was everyone an ancient Egyptian?

    Article

    I will be honest – no child has actually asked me if the world was ever full of Ancient Egyptians! Having said that, by focusing on one part of the world, children are left with either this impression or the idea that nothing was happening elsewhere in the world. Clearly,...

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  • Teaching history and geography together in a meaningful way

    Article

    This article explores some of the  ways history and geography can be taught side by side, so that the sum of the parts adds up to more than the original. How can we teach history with geography and vice  versa, to the benefit of both, while fulfilling the aims of...

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