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  • Who wants to fight? Who wants to flee? Teaching history from a 'thinking skills' perspective

      Article
    Whatever shape the National Curriculum of the 21st century takes, history will have to show its relevance to major curricular areas and themes such as literacy, citizenship education and thinking skills. This ought to be easy: the critical, informed decision-making required by the modern citizen is practised in virtually every...
    Who wants to fight? Who wants to flee? Teaching history from a 'thinking skills' perspective
  • Approaches to the History Curriculum: Project based learning

      Briefing Pack
    Rationale/Origins Project based learning has been around for decades; it is not a new idea. When we think back to the curriculum of the 1970s and early 80s, integrated Humanities was once again all the rage. As the Nuffield review of 2008 highlights "between 1975 and 1983, HMI tried to...
    Approaches to the History Curriculum: Project based learning
  • The International Journal Volume 2 Number 2

      Journal
    International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research Volume 2, Number 2 July 2002 Letting the Past Speak Contributor John Fines (1938-1999) An obituary by Jon Nichol 3 Introduction 5 1 History In Schools 1. What is History for in Schools? 6 2. The Respect that is Owed to the...
    The International Journal Volume 2 Number 2
  • Podcast: End of the World Cults

      Podcast
    In this podcast Professor Penelope Corfield looks at the history of 'End of the World Cults'.  1. Why do people at times become urgently convinced that 'the End of the World is Nigh?' HA Members can listen to the full podcast here Short Reading list for End-of-the-World Cults: Two wide-ranging introductions:...
    Podcast: End of the World Cults
  • Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War

      Podcast
    Gary Sheffield, Professor of War studies, the University of Wolverhampton, is one of the UK's foremost historians on the First World War.  He is the author of numerous books and previously held posts at the University of Birmingham and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. In April 2014 he spoke at an HA event for teachers...
    Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War
  • Remembering the First World War: Using a battlefield tour of the Western Front

      Article
    Remembering the First World War: Using a battlefield tour of the Western Front to help pupils take a more critical approach to what they encounter The first year of the government's First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme is now under way, allowing increasing numbers of students from across Britain...
    Remembering the First World War: Using a battlefield tour of the Western Front
  • Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair

      Article
    On the north-western side of the City of London, directly in front of St Bartholomew's Hospital near the ancient church of St Bartholomew the Great, there once lay a ‘smooth field', now known as Smithfield. This open space of around ten acres had a long and turbulent history. In medieval...
    Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair
  • Triumphs Show 170: making a place for fieldwork in history lessons

      Journal article
    Why ‘do’ local history? The new (grades 9–1) GCSE specifications place a lot of importance on the local environment. The rationale for this is to get students to situate a site in its historical context, and to examine the relationship between local and national developments. Initially this change was the...
    Triumphs Show 170: making a place for fieldwork in history lessons
  • Exploring diversity at GCSE

      Teaching History article
    Having already reflected on ways of improving their students' understanding of historical diversity at Key Stage 3, Joanne Philpott and Daniel Guiney set themselves the challenge of extending this to post-14 students by means of fieldwork activities at First World War battlefields sites. In addition, they wanted to link the study...
    Exploring diversity at GCSE
  • Memorialisation and the First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme

      HA Teacher Fellowship: Conflict, Art and Remembrance
    In this podcast Simon Bendry, Programme Director for the UCL Institute of Education’s First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme, discusses the programme and its impact. This podcast was recorded as part of the Teacher Fellowship Programme on Conflict, Art and Remembrance.
    Memorialisation and the First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme
  • History and Law: Lenin - How studying history can help with a career within the field of the law

      History and Careers Unit 3
    The aim of this enquiry is to show students that a history education teaches many of the skills that are vital for a number of roles within the field of the law - i.e. solicitors, barristers, judges, serving jury members and those called as witnesses. The notes below are a...
    History and Law: Lenin - How studying history can help with a career within the field of the law
  • Transforming Year 11's conceptual understanding of change

      Article
    For all that history teachers appreciate the need to build substantive knowledge and conceptual understanding systematically over time, they are also likely to have experienced that sickening moment when they realise that a Year 11 pupil has somehow missed something fundamental. In Anna Fielding's case, her pupil's misconception was related to...
    Transforming Year 11's conceptual understanding of change
  • Triumphs Show 113: How to make the Elizabethan Religious Settlement sufficiently complicated for Year 8

      Article
    This edition of the 'Triumphs Show' explains 'How to make the Elizabethan Religious Settlement sufficiently complicated for Year 8'.
    Triumphs Show 113: How to make the Elizabethan Religious Settlement sufficiently complicated for Year 8
  • Developing pupil explanation through web debates

      Article
    Kathryn Greenfield became dissatisfied with her pupils' written responses, particularly the rather limited explanations that they were giving in support of points that they made. Drawing here on recent work in using Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) to develop pupil historical argument and reasoning, Greenfield explains how she used web debates...
    Developing pupil explanation through web debates
  • Secondary Quality Mark: Exemplar applications & case studies

      Multipage Article
    Just as we model examples for our pupils, we understand that knowing what a QM gold or silver school looks like is just as important to any school thinking about taking part. In this section you will find a selection of full QM case studies as well as a number...
    Secondary Quality Mark: Exemplar applications & case studies
  • Teacher Fellowship Programme: Conflict, Art and Remembrance

      Teacher Fellowship Programme 2019
    Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red was a commemorative art installation of 888,246 handmade ceramic poppies at the Tower of London in 2014, by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper. It has been described as “the most popular art installation as well as arguably the most effective expression of commemoration...
    Teacher Fellowship Programme: Conflict, Art and Remembrance
  • Teaching history's big pictures: including continuity as well as change

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. School history teachers are not the only ones wrestling with the challenges of building ‘big pictures' that do justice to complexity. In this article, social and cultural historian Penelope Corfield puts our interest in long-term...
    Teaching history's big pictures: including continuity as well as change
  • Young Quills Awards 2016 – Winners and Reviews

      Multipage Article
    The Young Quills awards are presented annually by the HA for best historical fiction for young and youth readers released in the previous year. The final decision of the winners is selected by an adult judging panel who are interested in the historical accuracy and presentation as well as by the...
    Young Quills Awards 2016 – Winners and Reviews
  • The Victorian Age

      Classic Pamphlet
    This Classic Pamphlet was published in 1937 (the centenary of the accession of Queen Victoria, who succeeded to the throne on June 20, 1837). Synopsis of contents: 1. Is the Victorian Age a distinct 'period' of history? Landmarks establishing its beginning: the Reform Bill, railways, other inventions, new leaders in...
    The Victorian Age
  • Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer

      Article
    John Painter explores a strategically-important French boundary town, over which neighbouring powers have competed for over 1,200 years. Montreuil in Picardy is one of the most interesting small towns in northern France and a good base for visiting the battlefields of Crécy and Agincourt as well as the Somme Western...
    Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer
  • Bristol and the Slave Trade

      Classic Pamphlet
    Captain Thomas Wyndham of Marshfield Park in Somerset was on voyage to Barbary where he sailed from Kingroad, near Bristol, with three ships full of goods and slaves thus beginning the association of African Trade and Bristol. In the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Bristol was not a place of...
    Bristol and the Slave Trade
  • The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815

      Article
    John Morewood explores the events of 18 June 1815 in detail and asks just how accurate is our view of what happened on the field of Waterloo. Summary Waterloo is the most famous battle in a four-battle campaign fought from 15 June to 19 June 1815. On one side were...
    The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815
  • 1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘When Kings and chief officers suffer their under rulers to misuse their subjects and will not hear nor remedy their people's wrongs when they complain, then suffereth God the rebel to rage and to execute that part of His justice which the partial prince will not.' Thus did the Tudor...
    1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade
  • Polychronicon 158: Reinterpreting Napoleon

      Article
    On 18 June 2015, the two-hundredth anniversary of the great battle of Waterloo will be commemorated in Britain and on the continent (though not in France). It will represent the climax of the Napoleonic bicentenary, which has been in full flow since the turn of the twenty-first century. Fresh biographies...
    Polychronicon 158: Reinterpreting Napoleon
  • Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust

      Article
    International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research [IJHLTR], Volume 14, Number 2 – Spring/Summer 2017 ISSN: 14472-9474 Abstract In this article I seek to encourage those involved in Holocaust education in schools to engage not just with the Holocaust but also with its aftermath. I conceptualise the latter in terms of two...
    Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust