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  • Podcast: End of the World Cults

      Podcast
    In this podcast Professor Penelope Corfield looks at the history of 'End of the World Cults'.  1. Why do people at times become urgently convinced that 'the End of the World is Nigh?' HA Members can listen to the full podcast here Short Reading list for End-of-the-World Cults: Two wide-ranging introductions:...
    Podcast: End of the World Cults
  • Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War

      Podcast
    Gary Sheffield, Professor of War studies, the University of Wolverhampton, is one of the UK's foremost historians on the First World War.  He is the author of numerous books and previously held posts at the University of Birmingham and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. In April 2014 he spoke at an HA event for teachers...
    Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War
  • Britain: the regional battlefields...

      ...that helped to create a nation!
    In this article Geoffrey Carter will be taking a look at battlefields as key elements in British history and how these can be incorporated into the study of history at various levels and in various periods. The regional nature of many historic conflicts is sometimes forgotten but this is an...
    Britain: the regional battlefields...
  • Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair

      Article
    On the north-western side of the City of London, directly in front of St Bartholomew's Hospital near the ancient church of St Bartholomew the Great, there once lay a ‘smooth field', now known as Smithfield. This open space of around ten acres had a long and turbulent history. In medieval...
    Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair
  • Driver Ben Cobey 8th Royal Field Artillery

      Article
    Alf Wilkinson asks why three men were awarded the Victoria Cross during the retreat from Mons in August 1914 and the fourth involved in the action wasn’t. What does that tell us about Britain during the arly days of the Great War? In August 1914, when war broke out, the...
    Driver Ben Cobey 8th Royal Field Artillery
  • 'Wanted, The Elusive Charlie Peace': A Sheffield Killer Of The 1870s As Popular Hero

      Historian article
    On 28 November 1876, William and John Habron, Irish brothers habitually in trouble with the police, were tried at Manchester Assizes for the murder three months before of Police Constable Nicholas Cock (on the basis of ‘scientific’ footprint evidence at the scene of the crime). The jury found 19 year-old...
    'Wanted, The Elusive Charlie Peace': A Sheffield Killer Of The 1870s As Popular Hero
  • The Centenary of the First World War: An unpopular view

      Article
    We are delighted to have an original article by Gary Sheffield in this edition of The Historian. Gary Sheffield is Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton. He is a specialist on Britain at war 1914-45 and is one of Britain's foremost historians on the First World War. He has...
    The Centenary of the First World War: An unpopular view
  • The Victorian Age

      Classic Pamphlet
    This Classic Pamphlet was published in 1937 (the centenary of the accession of Queen Victoria, who succeeded to the throne on June 20, 1837). Synopsis of contents: 1. Is the Victorian Age a distinct 'period' of history? Landmarks establishing its beginning: the Reform Bill, railways, other inventions, new leaders in...
    The Victorian Age
  • Bristol and the Slave Trade

      Classic Pamphlet
    Captain Thomas Wyndham of Marshfield Park in Somerset was on voyage to Barbary where he sailed from Kingroad, near Bristol, with three ships full of goods and slaves thus beginning the association of African Trade and Bristol. In the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Bristol was not a place of...
    Bristol and the Slave Trade
  • The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars

      Article
    Scum of the earth – or fine fellows? Carole Divall asks whether the men of the British Army really were ‘the scum of the earth’, as often asserted, or willing soldiers who earned the respect of the French. ‘Soldiers were regarded as day labourers engaged in unsavoury business; a money...
    The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars
  • The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815

      Article
    John Morewood explores the events of 18 June 1815 in detail and asks just how accurate is our view of what happened on the field of Waterloo. Summary Waterloo is the most famous battle in a four-battle campaign fought from 15 June to 19 June 1815. On one side were...
    The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815
  • 1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘When Kings and chief officers suffer their under rulers to misuse their subjects and will not hear nor remedy their people's wrongs when they complain, then suffereth God the rebel to rage and to execute that part of His justice which the partial prince will not.' Thus did the Tudor...
    1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade
  • French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?

      Article
    The year 1066 - the one universally remembered date in English history, so well-known that banks advise customers not to choose it as their PIN number - opened the country up to French influence in spectacular fashion. During the ‘long twelfth century' (up to King John's death in 1216) that...
    French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?
  • The Unfortunate Captain Peirce

      Article
    An apprentice biographer researches the career of an eighteenth-century sea captain On a cold January afternoon in 1986, my neighbour announced that he intended to go to Dorset's Purbeck coast that night. Puzzled, I asked why. He explained it was the 200th anniversary of the wreck of the East Indiaman,...
    The Unfortunate Captain Peirce
  • The Early Mediaeval State

      Classic Pamphlet
    In order to define the constitution of a state, theorists and historians still apply Aristotle's categories; monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy. This method has obvious limitations; there can be no doubt that the formal sovereignty either of an individual or of a minority or a majority does not of itself suffice...
    The Early Mediaeval State
  • Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England

      Article
    To booke and pen: Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England As a student in the early 1970s, I became acutely aware that formal provision for women's education was a relatively recent development. I was at Bedford College, which originated in 1849 as the first higher education institution...
    Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England
  • Cathars and Castles in Medieval France

      Article
    Almost exactly 800 years ago, in September 1213, a decisive battle was fought at Muret, about ten miles south-west of Toulouse. King Peter II of Aragon, fighting with southern allies from Toulouse and elsewhere, faced an army largely made up of northern French crusaders who had invaded the region at the...
    Cathars and Castles in Medieval France
  • How damaging to the Nazis was the Shetland Bus between 1940 and 1944?

      Article
    The Shetland Bus operation may be considered successful in that it supplied Norwegian resistance movements with weapons and took many refugees from Norway to Shetland, and that it managed to bind just shy of 300,000 German troops in Norway. However, because of this operation, forty-four men lost their lives, and...
    How damaging to the Nazis was the Shetland Bus between 1940 and 1944?
  • History Painting in England: Benjamin West, Philip James de Loutherbourg, J.M.W. Turner

      Article
    History Painting is defined in Grove's Dictionary of Art as the ‘depiction of several persons engaged in an important or memorable action, usually taken from a written source.' Though History Painters as important as Rubens and Van Dyke worked - in Van Dyke's case for nine years - in England,...
    History Painting in England: Benjamin West, Philip James de Loutherbourg, J.M.W. Turner
  • Cyprus: another Middle East issue

      Article
    Although Cyprus, the third largest Mediterranean island, remained nominally under Turkish suzerainty until 1914, the British were established there after the 1878 Congress of Berlin. The idea then was that, from this base, Britain could protect Turkey against threats from Russia, while ensuring that the Turks reformed their treatment of...
    Cyprus: another Middle East issue
  • Neville Chamberlain: Villain or Hero?

      Historian article
    Perhaps no other British figure of the twentieth century has been as vilified or as celebrated as Neville Chamberlain, the British Prime Minister from 1937 to 1940. In 1999, a BBC Radio 4 poll of prominent historians, politicians and commentators rated Chamberlain as one of the worst Prime Ministers of...
    Neville Chamberlain: Villain or Hero?
  • Oliver Cromwell 1658-1958

      Classic Pamphlet
    Ever since the death of Oliver Cromwell 300 years ago his reputation has been the subject of controversy. The royalist view of him was expressed by Clarendon: "a brave bad mad," an ambitious hypocrite. This interpretation was supported by many former Parliamentarians: Edmund Ludlow regarded Cromwell as the lost leader...
    Oliver Cromwell 1658-1958
  • The Government of the Roman Empire

      Classic Pamphlets
    The Government of the Roman Empire, as everyone knows, was autocratic, and, like all autocracies, it was ‘tempered by assassination' or by military revolution. The emperor ruled through an imperial service, at once civil and military, in which several grades, corresponding to the social classes of the empire, were always...
    The Government of the Roman Empire
  • The British General Strike 1926

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘The General Strike is a challenge to Parliament and is the road to anarchy and ruin.' (Stanley Baldwin, Prime Minister, 6th May 1926).‘The General Council does not challenge the Constitution ... the sole aim of the Council is to secure for the miners a decent standard of life. The Council...
    The British General Strike 1926
  • A Tale of Two Chancellors: The Ineffectual Reformation in Elizabethan Staffordshire

      Article
    The Elizabethan Reformation in Staffordshire had a shallow seedbed. The radical reformers of the 1540s had greeted the conversion of the county with a mixture of high hopes and hyperbole. The East Anglian preacher and disciple of Latimer, Thomas Becon, wrote a treatise The Iewel of Ioye urging that itinerant...
    A Tale of Two Chancellors: The Ineffectual Reformation in Elizabethan Staffordshire