World

The modern world cannot be studied without examining the course, impact and legacy of two world wars, the resources in this section set out to look at both the First and Second World Wars in their global context. The section also includes the Cold War and its impact in Latin America, South-East Asia and parts of Africa. This period also sees the rise and fall of European imperialism and the changing nature of global politics and economics as technology brings different stories from so many parts of the world directly to us. Read more

Sort by: Date (Newest first) | Title A-Z
Show: All | Articles | Podcasts | Multipage Articles
  • Comparing the Bay of Pigs Invasion and the Jameson Raid

    Article

    Duplicated Debacles? A comparison of the 1895-96 Jameson Raid and the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion. Adam Burns and Robert Gallimore take us on two invasions, one by land and one by sea. Following the Cuban Revolution of 1959 and the rise to power of the socialist regime of Fidel...

    Click to view
  • Populism, Progressivism and Trumpism

    Article

    Populism, Progressivism and Trumpism: third party, inter-party and intraparty candidates in campaigns for the American presidency Michael Dunne explores the complexities of American presidential political campaigning over the last 200 years. Vox populi, vox dei. The voice of the people is the voice of God. Since these words were first...

    Click to view
  • Mission to Kabul: Destabilising the British strategic position, 1916

    Article

    Jules Stewart gives us an insight into how the Germans attempted to destabilise the British strategic position in Afghanistan during the Great War. On a state visit to Berlin in 1928, the Emir of Afghanistan Amanullah Khan was shown a display of the latest in German technology, which included a...

    Click to view
  • British armoured cars on the Eastern Front in the First World War

    Article

    Charlotte Alston reveals a little-known British involvement on the Eastern Front in the Great War.In early January 1918, Lieutenant Commander Soames of the British Armoured Car Division at Kursk, in Russia, telegraphed to his commandingofficer Oliver Locker Lampson, who was in London, to thank him for his Christmas greetings. All...

    Click to view
  • The Victorian Age

    Article

    This Classic Pamphlet was published in 1937 (the centenary of the accession of Queen Victoria, who succeeded to the throne on June 20, 1837). Synopsis of contents: 1. Is the Victorian Age a distinct 'period' of history? Landmarks establishing its beginning: the Reform Bill, railways, other inventions, new leaders in...

    Click to view
  • The Sykes-Picot agreement

    Article

    Paula Kitching reveals how a secret diplomatic negotiation 100 years ago provides an insight into the political complexities of the modern-day Middle East. The Middle East is an area frequently in the news. Over the last ten years the national and religious tensions appear to have exploded with whole regions...

    Click to view
  • WWI and the flu pandemic

    Article

    In our continuing Aspects of War series Hugh Gault reveals that theflu pandemic, which began during the First World War, presentedanother danger that challenged people’s lives and relationships. Wounded in the neck on the first day of the battle of the Somme, 1 July 1916, Arthur Conan Doyle’s son Kingsley...

    Click to view
  • Bristol and the Slave Trade

    Article

    Captain Thomas Wyndham of Marshfield Park in Somerset was on voyage to Barbary where he sailed from Kingroad, near Bristol, with three ships full of goods and slaves thus beginning the association of African Trade and Bristol. In the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Bristol was not a place of...

    Click to view
  • Black History and the History of Slavery

    Article

    Black History and the History of Slavery: Rethinking the agenda, Dr Madge Dresser, F.R.Hist.R. Associate Professor of History University of the West of EnglandIn a globalising world and with an increasingly diverse population, traditional histories are being rethought. As the influence of popular memory on national identity and political allegiance is...

    Click to view
  • Polychronicon 160: Interpreting 'The Birth of a Nation'

    Article

    Controversial from the first year of its release in 1915, 'The Birth of a Nation' has been hailed as both the greatest film ever made and the most racist. On 8 February 1915, it premiered in Los Angeles as 'The Clansman', the name of the novel and play upon which...

    Click to view
  • Will China Democratise?

    Article

    Michael T. Davis compares the parallels between the democratic expectations, or possibilities, of modern-day China with Britain's democratic evolution from the eighteenth century to the emerging democracy of the nineteenth century.The future is an unfamiliar place for historians. Yet we stand on the edge of an historic shift away from...

    Click to view
  • The Story of the African Queen

    Article

    Click to view
  • The shortest war in history: The Anglo-Zanzibar War of 1896

    Article

    At 9am on 27 August 1896, following an ultimatum, five ships of the Royal Navy began a bombardment of the Royal Palace and Harem in Zanzibar. Thirty-eight, or 40, or 43 minutes later, depending on which source you believe, the bombardment stopped when the white flag of surrender was raised...

    Click to view
  • The Indian Mutiny - Pamphlet

    Article

    Harrison's booklet takes an evaluative look, at not just the effects of the Indian Mutiny on Indo-British history, but at the reporting of this event over the years. He begins with a look at the prejudices of British writers and British historians' attitude towards the mutiny, highlighting the flawed confidence western...

    Click to view
  • Richard Evans Medlicott lecture: The Origins of the First World War

    Article

    This year the Historical Association's Medlicott medal for services to history went to Professor Sir Richard Evans. Richard Evans is the Regius Professor of History at Cambridge and President of Wolfson College, Cambridge. He has written numerous highly respected and internationally best-selling books. Evans is bests known for his works on...

    Click to view
  • Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War

    Article

    Gary Sheffield, Professor of War studies, the University of Wolverhampton, is one of the UK's foremost historians on the First World War.  He is the author of numerous books and previously held posts at the University of Birmingham and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. In April 2014 he spoke at an HA event for teachers...

    Click to view
  • D-Day, Commemorations - the last big year to remember?

    Article

    This year it was the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The world's politicians and media went into overdrive about it. The BBC dedicated a whole day to the coverage, mainly live from Normandy while small events took place around the UK. For a whole day the upcoming centenary of the First...

    Click to view
  • The Centenary of the First World War: An unpopular view

    Article

    We are delighted to have an original article by Gary Sheffield in this edition of The Historian. Gary Sheffield is Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton. He is a specialist on Britain at war 1914-45 and is one of Britain's foremost historians on the First World War. He has...

    Click to view
  • Sir Francis Dent and the First World War

    Article

    Not your typical soldier, not your typical service The term ‘citizen soldier' evokes a particularly powerful image in Britain. The poignant histories of the ‘Pals' Battalions' cast a familiar, often tragic shadow over the popular memory of the First World War. Raised according to geographical and occupational connections, names such...

    Click to view
  • First World War treaties and entrenchment

    Article

    Podcast and Presentation from HA Annual Conference 2014 Saturday - Session 3 - SGPK3 They won't be home for Christmas: the First World War treaties and entrenchment Paula Kitching Freelance Historian and Consultant As men around the UK and Empire rushed to recruitment centres to volunteer for a conflict that...

    Click to view