Visits

‘Every holiday, trip to the adjacent town, country walk is a learning experience’ – or at least it could be. Have a read of the articles in our visits section, these articles are from our publications and explore the history of particular areas and how particular sites can be put into historical frameworks and interpreted.  The articles form ‘my favourite place’ – a regular feature in the historian can open up places as you reflect on how the simplest place can become a site for affection and reflection once you know something about it. Additionally they just make you want to get out and explore the world around you – trip to Magdeburg or Swansea Castle anyone?

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  • Out and about in Sheffield

    Article

    This article was commissioned by the Sheffield Branch of the Historical Association in response to an editorial invitation for items of wide Local History interest to be submitted for publication. It is hoped that John Salt's insight will encourage members to visit Sheffield and also give them ideas on what...

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  • Out and about in Coventry

    Article

    Coventry and ‘phoenix' seem to be complementary words. Different images to different people. The central medieval area of Coventry is well worth the enjoyment of a gentle stroll. It contains the potential challenge of 400 listed buildings to visit! This article is intended to be an ‘appetite-wetter' which will draw...

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  • Out and about in D.H. Lawrence country

    Article

    Eastwood is a busy, small town, about twelve miles west of Nottingham. It lies just within the county boundary with Derbyshire. Its name probably derived from a settlement in a clearing of the old Sherwood Forest. It sits mostly on a hilltop, which is the meeting place for main roads...

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  • Out and About near Cromford in Derbyshire

    Article

    The River Derwent is a dominant feature of the Derbyshire  landscape from the Ladybower Reservoir to where it joins the River Trent just south of Derby. This river is noted for the sheer power and volume of water it carries: in the 1720s Daniel Defoe observed ‘the Derwent is a...

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  • Out and about in Holderness

    Article

    East of Hull lies Holderness, a twohundred square mile portion of the former East Riding of Yorkshire, extending from Hornsea in the north to Spurn Head and flanked by the river Humber and the North Sea. It is a very fertile tract of rich agricultural countryside but it is particularly...

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  • Presenting Naseby

    Article

    The summer of 2007 saw the completion of new visitor facilities on and near the battlefield of Naseby. The two locations are the first to be created since the Cromwell Monument was finished in 1936 and they stand more than 5km (3 miles) apart, one of them 2km south-east of...

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  • Exploring the Cornish Religious Landscape

    Article

    The Cornish religious landscape shares one particularly significant feature with its Welsh neighbour to the north. The Celtic tendency to dedicate churches to very local saints is very strong in both Cornwall and Wales, with the church dedications frequently being mirrored by the place name. This similarity is, to an...

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  • Out and about in Nottingham

    Article

    There were people living in Nottinghamshire as far back as 40,000 BC, as excavations in the limestone caves at Cresswell Crags (near Worksop) have proved. Much later, when the Romans came, they drove two roads through parts of the county – the Fosse Way to the South, with associated developments...

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  • Twickenham as a Patriotic Town

    Article

    Twickenham from the 1890s onwards grew as a town with a special sense of history. Nobody in authority on the local council could quite forget the reputation which the district had acquired as a rural arcadia. The aristocrats and gentry who built villas in the parish in the late 17th...

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  • Cheshire Country Houses

    Article

    The popular image of Cheshire is of a flat green landscape dotted with cows, of black and white houses, a county remote from the great events that have shaped the nation's history. This reflects the endurance of the old manorial class that maintained its hold on the land and ensured...

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  • Jerone K Jerome and other travellers in the Thames Valley

    Article

    Travellers and visitors have streamed to, and through Oxford, for centuries. Its name conveys its very functional origin as a fording point on the River Thames. Obviously these travellers and visitors came from a variety of directions, and by a variety of routes, using land and water transport. On this...

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  • Flowers Block the Sun

    Article

    As Northern Ireland begins to hope for a long and hot summer, there is one famous landmark in Belfast that can be guaranteed to be ready for a six month summer, regardless of rain or shine. Reg Maxwell, veteran of over thirty years in Belfast City Council Parks Department and...

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  • Dickens' Kent

    Article

    Although he was not born in Kent, Charles Dickens spent the happiest and most settled part of his childhood in Chatham and chose to return to the same area when, as an established author, he could afford to buy the house1 he had admired as a boy. It is said...

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  • Novelty and Amusement? Visiting the Georgian Country House

    Article

    The best-known country house visit in literature is that to Pemberley of Elizabeth Bennet, accompanied by her uncle and aunt Gardiner. Few events make better costume drama: personal and class unease, historic dress and carriages, grand house and landscape park. But beneath the tension of Elizabeth’s unexpected meeting with Darcy,...

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  • From Ashes to Icon

    Article

    Charles Stirton reflects on Middleton Hall and the creation of the National Botanic garden of Wales. Something significant is stirring in the gardening world. This year Wales will make history by opening the first national botanic garden in the third millennium. When visitors enter the new garden on the 24th...

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  • Durham

    Article

    Emeritus Professor G. R. Batho a personal perspective on the city of the prince bishops. We all have highly personal impressions of the towns and cities with which we are familiar. Few readers of The Historian are likely to emulate the good lady who hearing that I was leaving the...

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  • Cambridge

    Article

    Elisabeth Leedham-Green reflects on reality in the famous university town of Cambridge. This is a sharp place, best encountered when, as surprisingly often, the sun is shining and there is frost in the air. Then the stone sparkles and seems to float a few inches above the gleaming grass —...

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  • The National Tramway Museum and its Archives

    Article

    The National Tramway Museum, set on a Derbyshire hill at Crich, is one of the most attractive and fascinating in Britain. Rosemary Thacker introduces some of its technical and archival treasures. From its introduction at Birkenhead from the United States in 1860, the tramcar became the first vehicle in Great...

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