Roman Britain

Roman Britain is a familiar topic on the primary curriculum and links chronologically to the Stone Age to Iron Age topic as well as the Saxons and Vikings.  The focus is upon invasion, conquest, rebellion and Romanisation.

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  • The End of Roman Britain

    Article

    Writing poems in the KS2 literacy hour about the Saxon destruction of a Roman town. (These resources are attached below) Children studied an artist's picture of a bustling Roman market place. The class developed ideas about the Saxon impact upon the town by studying a contemporary Saxon poem, The Ruin,...

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  • The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

    Article

    Before the Romans arrived the islands which now make up Britain were populated with a variety of relatively large and small fortified or defended settlements. The people living here were usually part of tribes or clans and they probably raided each other's territory for cattle and other animals. The majority of people farmed in some way,...

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  • The Roman army: Spy!

    Article

    The year 5/6 class visited Julius Caesar's camp before he invaded Britain in 55 BC. I wanted the children to get a clear and full picture of what the Roman army was like, before we worked on Caesar's short-lived invasions of 55 and 54 BC and the Claudian conquest of...

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  • The world on the wall: exploring diversity on Hadrian's Wall

    Article

    Built in AD 122 by the order of the Emperor Hadrian, the 73 mile (80 Roman miles) long frontier goes from Bownesson-Solway in Cumbria to Wallsend on the River Tyne. Since 1987, the area has been inscribed as a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) World Heritage Site.Soldiers...

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  • Using apps in the history curriculum

    Article

    There are a lot of apps out there on multiple platforms and searching for ‘History’ does not really narrow anything down. Knowing which ones are useful, usable and worth paying for is often a case of trial and error. However, this list will save you trawling through the myriad of...

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  • Using the back cover image: Reconstructing the Romans

    Article

    Reconstruction drawings, diagrams and models are vital examples of interpretation that we can use to help pupils understand the past. On one level they help to fire imagination, while on another they offer a way of presenting important historical facts. The image overleaf is a reconstruction drawing of Chester's Roman...

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  • What confuses primary children in history...

    Article

    Young children who automatically see shiny things as new no matter what their age, those who mix up technology from one age with another, those who dismiss people in the past as stupid because they did not have the possessions we have today, those who equate the age of a...

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  • Working with Boudicca texts - contemporary, juvenile and scholarly

    Article

    Please note: this article was written before the the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may now be outdated. Robert Guyver describes a model for teaching Boudicca’s rebellion to pupils aged 7 to 13. Drawing on the tradition of critical source evaluation, he nonetheless shuns aspects of that tradition in favour of...

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