Cross Curricular

Cross-curricular working takes careful planning, but well done well it enhances learning and enables students to think beyond the confines of the school curriculum. History teachers can set up projects with other subjects as diverse as Maths, English and Art. Non-school subjects, such as Archaeology also relate well to History.

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  • Having 'Great Expectations' of Year 9

    Article

    Having ‘Great Expectations' of Year 9: Inter-disciplinary work between English and history to improve pupils' historical thinking. What scope does studying a classic novel in both English and history provide for meaningful cross-curricular work and how might engaging with historical fiction help pupils engage more effectively with the realities of...

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  • Disciplining cross-curricularity?

    Article

    Disciplining cross-curricularity? Cottenham Village College history department's inter-disciplinary projects: an evaluationWhy should we think in inter-disciplinary rather than cross-curricular terms when planning collaborative work with colleagues in other subjects? What scope is there for working in inter-disciplinary ways and what is the value of such work? James Woodcock explores these...

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  • Making cross-curricular links in history

    Article

    Alf Wilkinson has been working as ‘National Subject Lead' for History, co-ordinating a programme of support for schools, funded by the DCSF and delivered in partnership with the Historical Association and the CfBT. Here he draws on that work and the insights it has given him into effective practices in...

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  • Teaching History 138: Enriching History

    Article

    Editorial HA Secondary News Alf Wilkinson: Making cross-curricular links in history: some ways forward. James Woodcock: Disciplining cross-curricularity? Cottenham Village College history department's inter-disciplinary projects: an evaluation. Michael Monaghan: Having ‘Great Expectations' of Year 9 Inter-disciplinary work between English and history to improve pupils' historical thinking. Jamie Byrom:  ‘How do ideas...

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  • History`s secret weapon: the enquiry of a disciplined mind.

    Article

    History`s secret weapon: the enquiry of a disciplined mind.As a local authority adviser, Andrew Wrenn's advice has often been sought by history departments, both those seeking to resist ill-conceived and potentially damaging cross-curricular initiatives and those keen to exploit new opportunities for meaningful inter-disciplinary collaboration. Drawing on his knowledge of...

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  • Maths and History - Cross Curricular Case Study

    Article

    Maths and Museums: Norwich Castle Museum Working with Key Stage 3 MathsFaye Kalloniatis (Museum Education Manager, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service)The project, ‘Storming the Castle, challenged the idea that museums are not places where schools can extend their students' maths skills. On the contrary, the project demonstrated that museums can...

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  • Interdisciplinary forays within the history classroom: how the visual arts can enhance (or hinder) historical understanding

    Article

    How might history and art mutually enrich each other and enhance pupil experience? The short answer, and there is much more to be said as Liz Dawes Duraisingh and Veronica Boix Mansilla show, is by taking themselves seriously as disciplines. This article reports and reflects on a case study of...

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  • Two Realms and an empire: history, geography and an investigation into landscape

    Article

    Teaching History 131 June 2008 The Historical Association 35 The idea that subjects should abandon their ‘silos' and work together is bandied about currently a great deal - ‘subjects' and ‘silos' alliterate after all and so, of course, does the word ‘slogan'. What might real interdisciplinary work mean? It is...

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  • Educational Resources on East Africa Key Stage 2 & 3 Geography & History

    Article

    Educational Resources on East Africa Key Stage 2 & 3 Geography & History   New learning resources to accompany the Royal Geographical Society's exhibition on African explorers entitled ‘Bombay Africans 1850-1910' are now available on the popular  ‘Unlocking the Archives' website for schools. The free resources target the key stage 2...

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  • Film history in the Classroom

    Article

    A PowerPoint presentation by Ben Walsh indicating ways in which we can use Film in the history classroom. We often look at images or watch film clips but do we always see all that there is to see...Click the link below to open the presentation>>>

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  • English, history and song in Year 9: mixing enquiries for a cross-curricular approach to teaching the most able

    Article

    Several articles in previous editions of Teaching History have touched on the themes of crosscurricularity, Assessment for Learning and the most able. Tony McConnell and Mandy Monaghan bring these themes together in describing how the English and history departments in their school have taken advantage of a natural area of...

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  • Mixing a G&T cocktail: teaching about heritage through a cross-curricular enquiry

    Article

    What should we do with our brightest and best? Neal Watkin and Johannes Ahrenfelt suggest an enquiry for a very high ability Year 8 group which is both challenging and genuinely historical. The enquiry itself has cross-curricular elements within its historical framework: it draws on geography, sociology and citizenship. This...

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  • How did changing conceptions of place lead to conflict in the American West? Reflecting on revision methods for GCSE

    Article

    Mary Woolley decided to make four revision sheets for her lower-band Year 11 set. Each was to help them view their American West study through a different lens. She was rather uncertain, however (and so were the pupils) about her fourth sheet on places. Her reflections on the revision sheet...

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  • Plotting maps and mapping minds: what can maps tell us about the people who made them

    Article

    As historians, we know that ‘factual’ information should never be uncritically accepted. And yet, too often, that is exactly what we do with the maps we use to locate ourselves and our students. Evelyn Sweerts and Marie-Claire Cavanagh, who now work in a European School in Brussels but until recently...

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  • Picturing place: what you get may be more than what you see

    Article

    Pictures abound in history classrooms and teachers use them in many different ways. They add - often literally - some colour to the past, helping us to imagine what different worlds were like. Pictures can be used quite legitimately in this way to fire imagination and stimulate interest. But we...

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  • Placing history: territory, story, identity - and historical consciousness

    Article

    How do we relate to the past? Does it tell us who we are? Is it a source of examples to follow and mistakes to avoid? Or can we go beyond that to something genuinely historical? Arthur Chapman and Jane Facey argue that as history teachers we have a responsibility...

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  • Sense, relationship and power: uncommon views of place

    Article

    Liz Taylor invites history teachers to consider how diverse and uncommon the ‘common’ person’s experience of place might be. She draws upon cultural geography to show how words like ‘place’, ‘space’ and ‘landscape’ can be unpacked and questioned and so become better tools for pupils’ critical thinking in both geography...

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  • Geography in the Holocaust: citizenship denied

    Article

    In this article David Lambert argues powerfully for teachers of the humanities to place citizenship at the centre of their work. He seeks to demonstrate that the division between subject-boundaries needs to be broken through if students are not to be denied what they are entitled to: an understanding of...

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  • Hitting the right note: how useful is the music of African-Americans to historians?

    Article

    Here is a wonderful reminder of the richness of materials available to history teachers. With ever greater emphasis being placed on different learning styles, it is a good moment to remind ourselves that we can cater for virtually all of them in our classrooms. This includes a preference for learning...

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  • School History Scene: the unique contribution of theatre to history teaching

    Article

    The study of history has to be vibrant. It is about real people, real dramas, real narrative, real human dilemmas. It is not surprising that, despite manifold structural pressures working against us, take-up for GCSE history is once again buoyant. There are all manner of reasons for this - is...

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