Progression & Assessment

The government defines the skills required from students at Key Stage 4 as developing: Read more

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  • Move Me On 166: getting the right pitch for GCSE teaching

    Article

    This feature is designed to build critical, informed debate about the character of teacher training, teacher education and professional development. This issue’s problem: Bob Williams is struggling to get the pitch right in teaching topics at GCSE that the school previously taught to Year 7. Bob Williams, now half way through his training year, is feeling very out...

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  • Responsive teaching: best practice formative assessment in history

    Article

    This workshop took place at the HA Annual Conference May 2017 in Manchester. Harry Fletcher-Wood, Institute for Teaching Formative assessment allows us to respond to students’ needs rapidly and appropriately.  This presentation looks beyond gimmicky approaches to Assessment for Learning and agonising demands for ‘tripleimpact marking’, outlining what research in...

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  • Shaping the debate

    Article

    As history departments in England prepare for the introduction of new GCSE specifications, the question of how to prepare students to succeed in the examination while also ensuring that they are taught rigorous history remains as relevant as ever. Faced with preparing students to answer a question that seemingly precluded...

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  • A guide to Assessment Reform at Key Stage 4

    Article

    There are big changes in assessment taking place at Key Stage 4. If you are still getting to grips with what those changes are and what you can expect it to look like in practice, or you want to compare the assessment approaches taken by different examination Boards, then this...

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  • Cunning Plan 162: Transferring knowledge from Key Stage 3 to 4

    Article

    Planning to deliver the new GCSE specifications presents a challenge and an opportunity to any history department, whatever their previous specification. The sweep of history that students will now study at GCSE is much broader than ‘Modern World’ departments are used to; including a medieval or early modern depth study...

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  • The knowledge illusion

    Article

    Focusing on students’ attempts to explain the relative significance of different factors in Hitler’s rise to power, Catherine McCrory explores the vexed question of why students who seem able to express necessary historical knowledge on one occasion cannot effectively reproduce it on another. Drawing on a detailed analysis of what...

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  • Transforming Year 11's conceptual understanding of change

    Article

    For all that history teachers appreciate the need to build substantive knowledge and conceptual understanding systematically over time, they are also likely to have experienced that sickening moment when they realise that a Year 11 pupil has somehow missed something fundamental. In Anna Fielding's case, her pupil's misconception was related to...

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  • Securing contextual knowledge in year 10

    Article

    Using regular, low-stakes tests to secure pupils' contextual knowledge in Year 10 Lee Donaghy was concerned that his GCSE students' weak contextual knowledge was letting them down. Inspired by a mixture of cognitive science and the arguments of other teachers expressed in various blogs, he decided to tackle the problem...

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  • Building and assessing historical knowledge on three scales

    Article

    The knowledge that ‘flavours' a claim: towards building and assessing historical knowledge on three scales While marking some Year 11 essays, Kate Hammond found her interest caught by significant differences between one kind of strong analysis and another. Some scored high marks but were less convincing. The achievement in these...

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  • Move Me On 156: Assessment for Learning

    Article

    This issue's problem: Fred North treats ‘Assessment for Learning' as though it is a bolt-on extra unconnected to his learning objectives Fred is an enthusiastic trainee who has generally made a good impression on students and colleagues over the course of his first term. He has been determined to establish a...

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  • Move Me On 154: Mixed Ability Groups

    Article

    This issue's problem:Joe Priestley is having problems providing sufficient challenge for the higher attainers within his mixed ability groups Joe Priestley has settled into his training placement very well and has impressed other members of the history department with his lively and engaging ideas. In his early teaching he was...

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  • New, Novice or Nervous? 152: Describing Progression

    Article

    'New, Novice or Nervous?' is for those new to the published writings of history teachers. Every problem you wrestle with, other teachers have wrestled with too. Quick fixes don't exist. But if you discover others' writing, you'll soon find - and want to join - something better: an international conversation...

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  • Move Me On 144: Defines GCSE teaching in terms of a diet of practice exam questions

    Article

    This issue's problem: Roger Wendover has come to define GCSE teaching in terms of a diet of practice exam questions. Roger is a few weeks into his second placement and his mentor, John, has been taken aback by the rigid approach that he has adopted in teaching Year 10. John was...

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  • Assessment of students' uses of evidence

    Article

    Assessment of students' uses of evidence: shifting the focus from processes to historical reasoning

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  • Ensuring progression continues into GCSE: let's not do for our pupils with our plan of attack

    Article

    Dale Banham continues a theme explored by many other teacher-authors in recent years, how to ensure that progression does not just stop in Year 9, leaving pupils stagnant in key areas of historical learning before getting picked up again in Year 12. He produces a more thorough rationale and commentary...

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  • What is progress in history?

    Article

    Evelyn Vermeulen argues that in order for teachers to identify outcomes for the learning of history, they must think clearly about the different attributes of the discipline - its ideas, structures and processes - and the relationship between them. Here, she takes us on her own professional thinking journey. She...

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