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  • Radicalism and its Results, 1760-1837

      Classic Pamphlet
    Radicalism with a large "R", unlike Conservatism with a large "C" and Liberalism with a large "L", is not a historical term of even proximate precision. There was never a Radical Party with a national organization, local associations, or a treasury. But there were, and there are, "Radicals", generally qualified...
    Radicalism and its Results, 1760-1837
  • Teacher Training (Survive Part 1)

      Survive Part 1
    There are today many teacher-training routes into the teaching profession. The teacher-training year is always a difficult balancing act between gaining enough classroom experience and enough understanding of the theories that underpin the discipline's key skills. As a result, each teacher-training route has advantages as well as disadvantages. With a...
    Teacher Training (Survive Part 1)
  • Enabling Year 7 to write essays on Magna Carta

      Teaching History article
    Setting out to teach Magna Carta to the full attainment range in Year 7, Mark King decided to choose a question that reflected real scholarly debates and also to ensure that pupils held enough knowledge in long-term memory to be able to think about that question meaningfully. As he gradually prepared his pupils to produce their own causation arguments in response to that question, King was startled by...
    Enabling Year 7 to write essays on Magna Carta
  • 1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘When Kings and chief officers suffer their under rulers to misuse their subjects and will not hear nor remedy their people's wrongs when they complain, then suffereth God the rebel to rage and to execute that part of His justice which the partial prince will not.' Thus did the Tudor...
    1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade
  • Scots Abroad in the Fifteenth Century

      Classic Pamphlet
    (Historical Association Pamphlet, No. 124, 1942) Dunlop's research into the occupations and attitudes of Scots abroad during the 15th century uncovers some surprising revelations about all members of the Scottish ex-pat society. She particularly notes the ‘scurrilous' opinions of the French regarding Scotsmen's behaviour. While Scottish diplomatists and envoys tended...
    Scots Abroad in the Fifteenth Century
  • ‘It’s More Complex Than I Assumed’

      IJHLTR Article
    International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research [IJHLTR], Volume 15, Number 1 – Autumn/Winter 2017ISSN: 14472-9474 Abstract As with many nations, the teaching of history in Australian schools is often contested. Two prevailing standpoints can be identified, the first of which, in broad terms, emphasises the acquisition of historical knowledge....
    ‘It’s More Complex Than I Assumed’
  • The Great Charter: Then and now

      Historian article
    Magna Carta is a document not only of national but of international importance. Alexander Lock shows how its name still has power all over the world, especially in the United States. Although today only three of its clauses remain on the statute book, Magna Carta still flourishes as a potent...
    The Great Charter: Then and now
  • The shortest war in history: The Anglo-Zanzibar War of 1896

      Historian article
    At 9am on 27 August 1896, following an ultimatum, five ships of the Royal Navy began a bombardment of the Royal Palace and Harem in Zanzibar. Thirty-eight, or 40, or 43 minutes later, depending on which source you believe, the bombardment stopped when the white flag of surrender was raised...
    The shortest war in history: The Anglo-Zanzibar War of 1896
  • Thomas Paine

      Pamphlet
    The radical writer Tom Paine (1737-1809) has become a neglected figure, but this work argues that he should be rightly regarded as an original thinker, whose publications contributed to revolutionary discourses in America, France and Britain in the late 18th Century. He deserves to be remembered in the United States...
    Thomas Paine
  • The Indian Mutiny - Pamphlet

      Classic Pamphlet
    Harrison's booklet takes an evaluative look, at not just the effects of the Indian Mutiny on Indo-British history, but at the reporting of this event over the years. He begins with a look at the prejudices of British writers and British historians' attitude towards the mutiny, highlighting the flawed confidence western...
    The Indian Mutiny - Pamphlet
  • Helping Year 9s explore multiple narratives through the history of a house

      Teaching History article
    A host of histories: helping Year 9s explore multiple narratives through the history of a house Described by the author Monica Ali as a building that ‘sparks the imagination and sparks conversations', 19 Princelet Street, now a Museum of Diversity and Immigration, captivated the imagination of teacher David Waters. He...
    Helping Year 9s explore multiple narratives through the history of a house
  • Early Modern Britain 1509-1745

      HA Secondary Resources (Key Stage 3)
    While the 2014 Curriculum sets out the broad focus of each particular content area, considerable choice has been left to history departments in determining which particular events or developments to include and how they can best 'combine overview and depth studies to help pupils understand both the long arc of...
    Early Modern Britain 1509-1745
  • 'Veni, Vidi, Vici!'

      Historian article
    A personal reflection on Julius Caesar and the conquest of Britain Julius Caesar always brings to mind the famous dictum of Winston Churchill, ‘History will be kind to me, for I shall write it!' In his writings Julius Caesar provides a vivid and detailed account of his invasions of Britain in...
    'Veni, Vidi, Vici!'
  • The Assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand

      First World War News
    On Saturday 28th of June it will be 100 years since the Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated with his wife Sophie in Sarajevo. As everyone knows or will know after this summer that assassination led to the start of the First World War. The young man who fired the...
    The Assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand
  • Anne Herbert: A life in the Wars of the Roses

      Historian article
    May I introduce you to Anne Herbert, Countess of Pembroke? I'm very fond of this modern imagined portrait by Graham Turner, partly because of the colour and detail but chiefly because it conveys a respect for the people who lived in the past and especially for Anne herself. My interest...
    Anne Herbert: A life in the Wars of the Roses
  • Tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime: using external support, local history and a group project to challenge the most able

      Teaching History article
    The most able can be challenged in a variety of ways and at a number of levels, from the extension question for the individual child to the extended enquiry for the most able class. In a Leading Edge History project, Guy Woolnough and his colleagues took the concept of challenge...
    Tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime: using external support, local history and a group project to challenge the most able
  • The Bristol Riots

      Classic Pamphlet
    In 1831, Bristol suffered the worst outbreak of urban rioting since the Gordon Riots in London over fifty years earlier. Twelve rioters were officially declared to have died as a result of confrontations with troops and special constables, and many more unidentifiable corpses were discovered among the ruins of the...
    The Bristol Riots
  • Waking up to complexity

      Teaching History article
    Waking up to complexity: using Christopher Clark's The Sleepwalkers to challenge over-determined causal explanations Teaching student to construct causal argument is a staple of history teaching and, in this year, questions about the causes of the First World War are particularly pertinent and once again the public eye. Claire Holliss,...
    Waking up to complexity
  • Women in Late Medieval Bristol

      Classic Pamphlet
    During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries Bristol was one of England's greatest towns, with a population of perhaps 100,000 after the Black Death of 1348. Its status was recognised in 1373, with its creation as the realm's first provincial urban county, but only in 1542, with the creation of the...
    Women in Late Medieval Bristol
  • Regional Aspects of the Scottish Reformation

      Classic Pamphlet
    Reformation Perspective In recent years studies of the Scottish Reformation have undergone a marked change. Religion is seldom advanced as the sole mainspring of the events of 1560 and explanations have been increasingly sought in political and economic terms. On the political side growing opposition to French influence within Scotland...
    Regional Aspects of the Scottish Reformation
  • The effect of the loss of the American Colonies upon British Policy

      Classic Pamphlet
    (1) Problems of an Empire in ruinsTwo weeks after Yorktown, but before the news of that disaster had reached England, George III wrote to Lord North that "The dye is now cast whether this shall be a great Empire or the least dignified of European states." England had not fought...
    The effect of the loss of the American Colonies upon British Policy
  • Franz Ferdinand

      Historian article
    The Kapuzinerkirche (Church of the Capuchins) in Vienna's Neue Markt is one of the more curious attractions of the city, housing as it does the Kaisergruft crypt in which the Habsburgs are entombed, or rather in which their bodies are entombed: the hearts are usually kept in the Loreto Chapel...
    Franz Ferdinand
  • The world in 1913: friendly societies

      Historian article
    Friendly societies were designed to help members to cope with the illness, death or unemployment of a household's breadwinner. Each month members, mostly men, paid into the society, often at a meeting in a pub and in return payments from the pooled funds were made to ill members and to...
    The world in 1913: friendly societies
  • Women and the Politics of the Parish in England

      Historian article
    Petticoat Politicians: Women and the Politics of the Parish in England The history of women voting in Britain is familiar to many. 2013 marked the centenary of the zenith of the militant female suffrage movement, culminating in the tragic death of Emily Wilding Davison, crushed by the King's horse at...
    Women and the Politics of the Parish in England
  • Year 9 face up to historical difference

      Teaching History article
    How many people does it take to make an Essex man? Year 9 face up to historical difference Teaching her Key Stage 3 students in Essex, Catherine McCrory was struck by the stark contrast between their enthusiasm for studying diverse histories of Africa and the Americas and their reluctance to...
    Year 9 face up to historical difference