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  • Historical Causation: Is One Thing More Important Than Another?

      Branch Lecture Podcast
    WHAT COLOUR ARE THE UNICORNS?Professor Steve Rigby, recently retired from the University of Manchester, delivered ‘Historical Causation: Is One Thing More Important Than Another?' to the Bolton Branch of the Historical Association on 29th November 2010.  His lecture gives a fascinating introduction to the philosophy of historical causation, looking at...
    Historical Causation: Is One Thing More Important Than Another?
  • HA Secondary History Survey 2010

      Survey
    Findings from the Historical Association survey of secondary history teachers 2010 Summary of key concerns about history teaching in English secondary schools *Full report attached below   1. The changing face of history teaching at Key Stage 3 (11-14): an emphasis on generic skills at the expense of subject knowledge and...
    HA Secondary History Survey 2010
  • Imperialism resurgent: European attempts to 'recolonise' South East Asia after 1945

      Historian article
    ‘To think that the people of Indochina would be content to settle for less [from the French] than Indonesia has gained from the Dutch or India from the British is to underestimate the power of the forces that are sweeping Asia today'. An American adviser in 1949 cited: Robin Jeffrey...
    Imperialism resurgent: European attempts to 'recolonise' South East Asia after 1945
  • History in Schools: What is the Future?

      History Debate Podcast
    The Future of history in our schools Whether you have children or not, whether you're a teacher or not, if you have a love of History this debate matters to you.
    History in Schools: What is the Future?
  • Men's Beards and Women's Backsides

      Historian article
    Since the late Middle Ages periods in which it was fashionable for men to be clean-shaven have alternated in Europe with periods in which it was fashionable for men to wear beards. In some periods clean-shavenness went together with long hair, at others beards went together with short hair, and...
    Men's Beards and Women's Backsides
  • Triumphs Show 139: Whodunnit? The Felling mining disaster of 1812

      Teaching History feature
    Whodunnit? The Felling mining disaster, 1812 The room buzzes as pathologists swap stories about injuries on the latest bodies. Some have virtually all limbs missing, others have been crushed by rockfall. Others have been found seemingly asleep with not a mark on their bodies. You have stepped into a Year...
    Triumphs Show 139: Whodunnit? The Felling mining disaster of 1812
  • Polychronicon 139: Civic denouncer: The lives of Pavlik Morozov

      Teaching History feature
    Germaine Greer (in the context of the Pirelli Calendar) once commented that the defining feature of a legend was that almost nothing said and believed about it was true. Pavlik Morozov, notorious both inside Russia and internationally for having denounced his father, almost certainly never did so. In September 1932, local...
    Polychronicon 139: Civic denouncer: The lives of Pavlik Morozov
  • From human-scale to abstract analysis: Year 7. Henry II & Becket

      Teaching History article
    Tim Jenner was working on a causation enquiry with his Year 7 students when he noticed that weak conceptions of change were limiting their ability to produce powerful and period-sensitive arguments. He therefore decided to digress into a temporary but explicit focus on analysing historical change. He created a deceptively...
    From human-scale to abstract analysis: Year 7. Henry II & Becket
  • The Origins of Parliament

      Classic Pamphlet
    He who would seek the origins of parliament cannot proceed without knowing that this is, and this has been, a matter much controverted. English politics have very often been conducted in terms of what has passed for history, not least because they have so frequently revolved around the rights and...
    The Origins of Parliament
  • Tudor Enclosures

      Classic Pamphlet
    Tudor enclosures hold the attention of historians because of the fundamental changes which they wrought in our system of farming, and in the appearance of the English countryside. At the same time, the subject is continually being re-investigated, and as a result it is no longer presented in the simple...
    Tudor Enclosures
  • The Industrial Revolution in England

      Classic Pamphlet
    Revolutions of the magnitude of the industrial revolution in England provoke historical controversy: such a revolution is a major discontinuity which a profession more skilled in explaining small changes finds difficult to understand. A revolution that touches a whole society is so diffuse that its significant events are difficult to...
    The Industrial Revolution in England
  • Government and Society in Late Medieval Spain

      Classic Pamphlet
    Government and Society in Late Medieval Spain: From the accession of the House of Trastámara to Ferdinand and IsabellaThe history of late medieval Spain is usually seen as a tiresome introduction to the reigns of the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella. Modern historians tend to portray them as ‘new monarchs',...
    Government and Society in Late Medieval Spain
  • Is any explanation better than none?

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. What do we know about progression in historical understanding? In Teaching History 113, Lee and Shemilt discussed what progression models can and cannot do to help us think about measuring and developing pupils' understanding and...
    Is any explanation better than none?
  • Are we creating a generation of 'historical tourists'?

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. A trip to the battlefields of the First World War throws into stark relief the challenges presented by work on interpretations related to historical sites. Andrew Wrenn first drew attention to the difficulties of promoting...
    Are we creating a generation of 'historical tourists'?
  • Faction in Tudor England

      Classic Pamphlet
    'This wicked Tower must be fed with blood' - W. S. Gilbert's dialogue sums up the popular myth of Tudor England. This pamphlet looks at the reality, a society and politics necessarily divided into rival factions by the pulls of patronage, local loyalty and the implications of personal monarchy, and...
    Faction in Tudor England
  • Jacobitism

      Classic Pamphlet
    In recent years, the debate over the nature, extent, and influence of the Jacobite movement during the 70 years following the Glorious Revolution of 1688 has become one of the new growth industries among professional historians, spawning scholarly quarrels almost as ferocious as those which characterised ‘the Cause' itself.The term...
    Jacobitism
  • The War of American Independence

      Classic Pamphlet
    In the two-hundredth year of American Independence, it is proper to ask: why did it occur? It need not have happened; it was the act of men, not immutable forces. But once the tensions became acute, the three thousand miles of ocean were a difficult chasm to bridge. The War...
    The War of American Independence
  • The Oxford Movement and Anglican Ritualism

      Classic Pamphlet
    The English Reformation of the Sixteenth century had been a compromise, both politically and theologically. The administrative framework of the medieval church, with its system of church courts, private patronage, pluralism, the social and financial gulf between the lower and higher clergy, its inadequacy of clerical education and its hierarchical...
    The Oxford Movement and Anglican Ritualism
  • The Great Revolt of 1381

      Classic Pamphlet
    The Great Revolt of 1381 began in South-West Essex sometime between late May and 2 June: contemporary narratives and record sources differ irreconcilably about the dates. It all started with the arrival of a royal tax commissioner, John Bampton, at Brentwood inBarnstable Hundred. He came to inquire into the evasion...
    The Great Revolt of 1381
  • Triumphs Show 135: how trainee teachers learned to put history back into GCSE

      Teaching History feature
    What do you know about how your local museums can help your GCSE planning and teaching? How can your new GCSE courses for September make use of the free resources, artefacts and images that our local and national museums house? That's just what the PGCE history group from Leeds Trinity...
    Triumphs Show 135: how trainee teachers learned to put history back into GCSE
  • Polychronicon 129: Reinterpreting Peterloo

      Teaching History feature
    The Peterloo massacre is one of the best-documented events in British history. It was the bloodiest political event of the 19th century on English soil. At St Peter's Fields in central Manchester on Monday 16 August 1819, a rally of around 60,000 people seeking parliamentary reform was violently dispersed by...
    Polychronicon 129: Reinterpreting Peterloo
  • Polychronicon 134: The Great War and Cultural History

      Teaching History feature
    Over the past two decades the historiography of the Great War has witnessed something of a revolution. Although historical revisionism is, of course, nothing out of the ordinary, the speed with which long-held assumptions about the First World War and its impact have been swept away has been quite astonishing....
    Polychronicon 134: The Great War and Cultural History
  • The Monarchies of Ferdinand and Isabella

      Classic Pamphlet
    On 12 December 1474, the news reached the Castillian city of Segovia, north-west of Madrid, that Henry IV, king of Castile, had died. After the proper ceremonies had been conducted in memory of the deceased monarch, his sister, Isabella, was proclaimed queen of Castile in that place. There was much...
    The Monarchies of Ferdinand and Isabella
  • How to make historical simulations adaptable, engaging and manageable

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Dan Moorhouse suggests that history teachers are sometimes put off role-play or simulations because the amount of preparation - intellectual and practical - appears both time-consuming and expensive. He argues that effective simulations need be...
    How to make historical simulations adaptable, engaging and manageable
  • The National Curriculum Attainment Target (from 2008)

      HITT Resource
    Level 4 Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by describing some of the main events, people and periods they have studied, and by identifying where these fit within a chronological framework. They describe characteristic features of past societies and periods to identify change and...
    The National Curriculum Attainment Target (from 2008)