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  • Podcast: End of the World Cults

      Podcast
    In this podcast Professor Penelope Corfield looks at the history of 'End of the World Cults'.  1. Why do people at times become urgently convinced that 'the End of the World is Nigh?' HA Members can listen to the full podcast here Short Reading list for End-of-the-World Cults: Two wide-ranging introductions:...
    Podcast: End of the World Cults
  • My Favourite History Place: Castle Hill, Huddersfield

      Historian feature
    Alison Hramiak tempts us to visit Castle Hill, south of Huddersfield, to look for traces of our long dead ancestors, to contemplate the passing of the centuries on that site and to enjoy the lovely views. It’s often the way that we ignore what’s geographically close to us when we visit...
    My Favourite History Place: Castle Hill, Huddersfield
  • My Favourite History Place: The Chantry Chapel of St Mary on Wakefield Bridge

      Historian feature
    Wakefield Bridge Chapel, by the River Calder, is thought by many to be the finest of four bridge chantries, the others being Bradford-on-Avon, Derby and Rotherham. The chapel at Wakefield was originally founded and endowed by the people of Wakefield and district between 1342 and 1359. In 1397 Edmund de Langley,...
    My Favourite History Place: The Chantry Chapel of St Mary on Wakefield Bridge
  • Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War

      Podcast
    Gary Sheffield, Professor of War studies, the University of Wolverhampton, is one of the UK's foremost historians on the First World War.  He is the author of numerous books and previously held posts at the University of Birmingham and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. In April 2014 he spoke at an HA event for teachers...
    Gary Sheffield: Origins of the First World War
  • Britain: the regional battlefields...

      ...that helped to create a nation!
    In this article Geoffrey Carter will be taking a look at battlefields as key elements in British history and how these can be incorporated into the study of history at various levels and in various periods. The regional nature of many historic conflicts is sometimes forgotten but this is an...
    Britain: the regional battlefields...
  • Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair

      Article
    On the north-western side of the City of London, directly in front of St Bartholomew's Hospital near the ancient church of St Bartholomew the Great, there once lay a ‘smooth field', now known as Smithfield. This open space of around ten acres had a long and turbulent history. In medieval...
    Smithfield's Bartholomew Fair
  • Out and about in Sheffield

      Article
    This article was commissioned by the Sheffield Branch of the Historical Association in response to an editorial invitation for items of wide Local History interest to be submitted for publication. It is hoped that John Salt's insight will encourage members to visit Sheffield and also give them ideas on what...
    Out and about in Sheffield
  • Driver Ben Cobey 8th Royal Field Artillery

      Article
    Alf Wilkinson asks why three men were awarded the Victoria Cross during the retreat from Mons in August 1914 and the fourth involved in the action wasn’t. What does that tell us about Britain during the arly days of the Great War? In August 1914, when war broke out, the...
    Driver Ben Cobey 8th Royal Field Artillery
  • Monty’s school: the benign side of Viscount Montgomery of Alamein

      Historian article
    Field-Marshal Montgomery has a reputation as a strong-willed battle-hardened leader, with a touch of the impetuous. Few know of his charitable side and yet in his later years this side was just as important to his activities. In this article we find out a bit more of this often simplistically...
    Monty’s school: the benign side of Viscount Montgomery of Alamein
  • Out and About in Oxford

      Journal article
    The Sheffield Branch of the Historical Association is a very active one. In addition to our monthly meetings we organise a range of study visits, from one-day trips to longer residential tours in the UK and occasionally in mainland Europe. In recent years, these have included visits to Portsmouth, Lincoln and Newark, Newcastle and Northumberland, and the battlefields of Waterloo....
    Out and About in Oxford
  • 'Wanted, The Elusive Charlie Peace': A Sheffield Killer Of The 1870s As Popular Hero

      Historian article
    On 28 November 1876, William and John Habron, Irish brothers habitually in trouble with the police, were tried at Manchester Assizes for the murder three months before of Police Constable Nicholas Cock (on the basis of ‘scientific’ footprint evidence at the scene of the crime). The jury found 19 year-old...
    'Wanted, The Elusive Charlie Peace': A Sheffield Killer Of The 1870s As Popular Hero
  • The Centenary of the First World War: An unpopular view

      Article
    We are delighted to have an original article by Gary Sheffield in this edition of The Historian. Gary Sheffield is Professor of War Studies, University of Wolverhampton. He is a specialist on Britain at war 1914-45 and is one of Britain's foremost historians on the First World War. He has...
    The Centenary of the First World War: An unpopular view
  • General workshop resources – HA Conference 2015

      Multipage Article
    The resources in this section are from the general history lectures and workshops presented at the HA Annual Conference 2015 in Bristol. The HA Annual Conference is a unique opportunity to join the history community on a weekend of engaging history. In the General pathway you can enjoy lectures from academic researchers...
    General workshop resources – HA Conference 2015
  • The Victorian Age

      Classic Pamphlet
    This Classic Pamphlet was published in 1937 (the centenary of the accession of Queen Victoria, who succeeded to the throne on June 20, 1837). Synopsis of contents: 1. Is the Victorian Age a distinct 'period' of history? Landmarks establishing its beginning: the Reform Bill, railways, other inventions, new leaders in...
    The Victorian Age
  • Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer

      Article
    John Painter explores a strategically-important French boundary town, over which neighbouring powers have competed for over 1,200 years. Montreuil in Picardy is one of the most interesting small towns in northern France and a good base for visiting the battlefields of Crécy and Agincourt as well as the Somme Western...
    Out and About in Montreuil-sur-Mer
  • Bristol and the Slave Trade

      Classic Pamphlet
    Captain Thomas Wyndham of Marshfield Park in Somerset was on voyage to Barbary where he sailed from Kingroad, near Bristol, with three ships full of goods and slaves thus beginning the association of African Trade and Bristol. In the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Bristol was not a place of...
    Bristol and the Slave Trade
  • The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars

      Article
    Scum of the earth – or fine fellows? Carole Divall asks whether the men of the British Army really were ‘the scum of the earth’, as often asserted, or willing soldiers who earned the respect of the French. ‘Soldiers were regarded as day labourers engaged in unsavoury business; a money...
    The British soldier in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars
  • The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815

      Article
    John Morewood explores the events of 18 June 1815 in detail and asks just how accurate is our view of what happened on the field of Waterloo. Summary Waterloo is the most famous battle in a four-battle campaign fought from 15 June to 19 June 1815. On one side were...
    The Battle of Waterloo: Sunday 18 June 1815
  • 1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade

      Classic Pamphlet
    ‘When Kings and chief officers suffer their under rulers to misuse their subjects and will not hear nor remedy their people's wrongs when they complain, then suffereth God the rebel to rage and to execute that part of His justice which the partial prince will not.' Thus did the Tudor...
    1450: The Rebellion of Jack Cade
  • Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust

      Article
    International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research [IJHLTR], Volume 14, Number 2 – Spring/Summer 2017 ISSN: 14472-9474 Abstract In this article I seek to encourage those involved in Holocaust education in schools to engage not just with the Holocaust but also with its aftermath. I conceptualise the latter in terms of two...
    Learning from the Aftermath of the Holocaust
  • French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?

      Article
    The year 1066 - the one universally remembered date in English history, so well-known that banks advise customers not to choose it as their PIN number - opened the country up to French influence in spectacular fashion. During the ‘long twelfth century' (up to King John's death in 1216) that...
    French chivalry in twelfth-century Britain?
  • The Unfortunate Captain Peirce

      Article
    An apprentice biographer researches the career of an eighteenth-century sea captain On a cold January afternoon in 1986, my neighbour announced that he intended to go to Dorset's Purbeck coast that night. Puzzled, I asked why. He explained it was the 200th anniversary of the wreck of the East Indiaman,...
    The Unfortunate Captain Peirce
  • The Early Mediaeval State

      Classic Pamphlet
    In order to define the constitution of a state, theorists and historians still apply Aristotle's categories; monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy. This method has obvious limitations; there can be no doubt that the formal sovereignty either of an individual or of a minority or a majority does not of itself suffice...
    The Early Mediaeval State
  • Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England

      Article
    To booke and pen: Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England As a student in the early 1970s, I became acutely aware that formal provision for women's education was a relatively recent development. I was at Bedford College, which originated in 1849 as the first higher education institution...
    Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England
  • My Favourite History Place: Sutton Hoo

      Article
    A Secret Uncovered, A Mystery Unsolved Sutton Hoo is a sandy heathland overlooking the estuary of the River Deben in Suffolk. In Old English a ‘hoo' is a promontory, ‘sutton' is southern, and ‘tun' is a settlement. Historians have known for years that the fields were farmed in the Iron...
    My Favourite History Place: Sutton Hoo