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  • Extending Primary Children's thinking through artefacts

      Primary History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. A research project was carried out with Maltese primary school children at San Andrea Infant and Middle school to see if learning strategies could accelerate pupils' cognitive development. The research involved a range of historical sources:...
    Extending Primary Children's thinking through artefacts
  • Artefacts in history education

      Article
    In history when we say objects we mean artefacts, that is, things made by people rather than natural objects. They provide archaeological evidence and can have various forms, from something tiny like a button to a huge building or ruins. The most ordinary objects can yield much historical evidence and...
    Artefacts in history education
  • Tudor Enclosures

      Classic Pamphlet
    Tudor enclosures hold the attention of historians because of the fundamental changes which they wrought in our system of farming, and in the appearance of the English countryside. At the same time, the subject is continually being re-investigated, and as a result it is no longer presented in the simple...
    Tudor Enclosures
  • Are we creating a generation of 'historical tourists'?

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. A trip to the battlefields of the First World War throws into stark relief the challenges presented by work on interpretations related to historical sites. Andrew Wrenn first drew attention to the difficulties of promoting...
    Are we creating a generation of 'historical tourists'?
  • Music and history combine at Key Stage 2

      Primary History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Section 1: Introduction Music is a powerful, emotive subject to enrich Historical, Geographical and Social Understanding. The Historical Association has a long and proud tradition of working closely with the Schools Music Association. In 2005, to...
    Music and history combine at Key Stage 2
  • The view from the classroom

      Primary History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. As teachers we are all responsible, with our pupils, for the environment within our classrooms. Together we create calm and order, challenge and activity. The environment beyond is of infinite variety. The view from my...
    The view from the classroom
  • Prehistoric Bristol

      Classic Pamphlet
    This period is represented in the valley of the Bristol Avon by the Acheulian industries, named from the type station of St. Acheul in the Somme valley, which has yielded many ovate and pear-shaped hand-axes characteristic of the period. These industries flourished during the very long Second Interglacial phase, a...
    Prehistoric Bristol
  • The snobbery of chronology: In defence of the generals on the Western Front

      Article
    Faced with the testimony of the huge casualty lists of the First World War, the desperate battles of attrition, the emotive evidence of the seemingly endless cemeteries and memorials, the moving war poetry of men such as Owen and Sassoon, and the memoirs of those who fought, it is not...
    The snobbery of chronology: In defence of the generals on the Western Front
  • Polychronicon 135: Post-modern Holocaust Historiography

      Article
    The field of Holocaust studies has been hit by an intellectual earthquake whose precise magnitude and long-term consequences cannot be ascertained at this stage. In 2007 Saul Friedländer published The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews 1939-1945. The book has been rightly celebrated as the first victim-centred synthetic history...
    Polychronicon 135: Post-modern Holocaust Historiography
  • Polychronicon 129: Reinterpreting Peterloo

      Article
    The Peterloo massacre is one of the best-documented events in British history. It was the bloodiest political event of the 19th century on English soil. At St Peter's Fields in central Manchester on Monday 16 August 1819, a rally of around 60,000 people seeking parliamentary reform was violently dispersed by...
    Polychronicon 129: Reinterpreting Peterloo
  • The Poor Law in Nineteenth-century England and Wales

      Classic Pamphlet
    Variety rather than uniformity characterised the administration of poor relief in England and Wales, and at no period was this more apparent than in the decades before the national reform of the poor law in 1834. Unprecedented economic and social changes produced severe problems for those responsible for social welfare,...
    The Poor Law in Nineteenth-century England and Wales
  • Case Study: Engaging history with National Trust tracker packs

      Primary History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. White Horse Hill in Oxfordshire is home to the famous chalk White Horse, and it has been for the last 3000 years. The history surrounding this hill, high up on the Berkshire Downs, goes back...
    Case Study: Engaging history with National Trust tracker packs
  • Hat on headstones

      Article
    The grave markers in churchyards and cemeteries are for the most part depressingly unimaginative both in their design and in their inscriptions but one occasionally meets with an attempt at striking an individual note, such as a sculpted depiction of a motor vehicle, or an animal, or the head-gear worn...
    Hat on headstones
  • Child labour in eighteenth century London

      Article
    On 1 March 1771, thirteen year-old John Davies, a London charity school boy, left his home in Half MoonAlley and made his way to Bishopsgate Street. There he joined thirteen other boys of similar age who, like him, were new recruits of the Marine Society, a charity that sent poor...
    Child labour in eighteenth century London
  • The Historian 100: A medieval credit crunch?

      The magazine of the Historical Association
    A medieval credit crunch? - Adrian R. Bell, Chris Brooks and Tony Moore (Read Article) Fascists behind barbed wire: political internment without trial in wartime Britain - Stephen M. Cullen (Read Article) Child labour in eighteenth century London - (Read Article) Hats on Headstones - A. D. Harvey (Read Article) Out and...
    The Historian 100: A medieval credit crunch?
  • Out and about in D.H. Lawrence country

      Article
    Eastwood is a busy, small town, about twelve miles west of Nottingham. It lies just within the county boundary with Derbyshire. Its name probably derived from a settlement in a clearing of the old Sherwood Forest. It sits mostly on a hilltop, which is the meeting place for main roads...
    Out and about in D.H. Lawrence country
  • Cooperative Learning: the place of pupil involvement in a history textbook

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Pupil involvement is at the heart of every good history lesson. Its planning ensures that pupils are given the opportunity to think for themselves, share ideas, discuss evidence and debate points. The history education community...
    Cooperative Learning: the place of pupil involvement in a history textbook
  • Wellington's Soldiers in the Napoleonic Wars

      Article
    Wellington's Soldiers in the Napoleonic WarsThe war with France, which began in 1793, had moved to the Iberian Peninsula by 1808. This year is therefore the two-hundredth anniversary of the commencement of the Peninsular War campaigns. War on the Peninsula demanded huge resources of manpower in order to defeat Napoleon....
    Wellington's Soldiers in the Napoleonic Wars
  • Upwards till Lepanto

      Article
    Ottoman society centred on the Sultan. He was lawgiver, religious official, leader in battle-and until the late sixteenth century an active field commander on campaign. The Law of Fratricide of Mehmet (Mohammed) II, 1451-81, urged each new Sultan to kill his brothers in order to produce a capable ruler and...
    Upwards till Lepanto
  • Stepping into the past: using images to travel through time

      Teaching History article
    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Pupils are eternally curious about their teachers. Do they really have lives outside the classroom? Could Miss Jones have once been a child? Does she have parents and grandparents and a past of her own?...
    Stepping into the past: using images to travel through time
  • The development of the British Navy

      Podcast
    In this podcast, Professor Bruce Collins of Sheffield Hallam University explores the development of the British navy during the French Wars and the 19th century. Professor Collins outlines the place of the navy in Britain’s psyche at the beginning of the French Wars and the importance of coastal transport, as well...
    The development of the British Navy
  • Disraeli, Peel and the Corn Laws: the making of a conservative reputation

      Article
    125 years after his death, Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, still provides the political lode-star for generations of Conservatives. Lately, for the first time in 30 years, Disraeli's name and example has been enthusiastically evoked by the party leadership and David Cameron has projected himself as a Disraeli for the...
    Disraeli, Peel and the Corn Laws: the making of a conservative reputation
  • Real Lives: Rebecca West

      Historian feature
    Our series ‘Real Lives’ seeks to put the story of the ordinary person into our great historical narrative. We are all part of the rich fabric of the communities in which we live and we are affected to greater and lesser degrees by the big events that happen on a daily...
    Real Lives: Rebecca West
  • Teaching History 186: Out now

      The HA's journal for secondary history teachers
    Read Teaching History 186: Removing Barriers We have in the past two years encountered a series of novel barriers to learning. Are the schools open? Are both students and teachers well enough to be there? How do you monitor learning on a Friday afternoon across a series of patchy network...
    Teaching History 186: Out now
  • History 375

      The Journal of the Historical Association, Volume 107, Issue 375
    Access all articles online (you first need to be logged in to the HA website and subscribed to History) History in Public: Power and Process, Harm and Help (pp 211-234) – Christel Annemieke Romein, Laura Doak, Hannah Parker, Janet Weston (Open Access) Everyday Public History (pp 235-248) – Huw Halstead (Open Access) History and Public Memory...
    History 375