Chronological Understanding

Sequencing, events, stories, pictures and periods over time to show how different times relate to each other and contribute to a coherent understanding of the past. You don’t have to teach topics in chronological order but need to relate the topics you teach to their chronological context.

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  • 'Doing Local History' through maps and drama

    Article

    Editorial note: John Fines produced two case studies of Local History for the Nuffield Primary History Project. One on them is published here for the first time.

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  • A View from the Classroom - Chronology

    Article

    Introduction As a teacher, the passing of time in a classroom may be: challenging, stimulating, appear endless, be subject to constant change, though never dull. Years pass, yet at times it can seem but yesterday, when I began to teach. My perception of time may be subject to personal recall,...

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  • A Vision of Britain Through Time

    Article

    This free-to-use and publically accessible website has now been updated and re-launched with a new look, extra content and improved search tools thanks largely to funding from JISC (the Joint Information Systems Committee of Britain's universities).Among the latest additions is a full listing of every General Election result, 1832 to...

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  • A creative Egyptian project

    Article

    IntroductionIdeally when teaching history, teachers will look to deliver projects that will engage and motivate, hopefully making the hard work of being creative stimulating and rewarding, based upon questioning, enquiry, investigation of sources and reaching conclusions grounded in the evidence.Ancient Egypt is one of those history topics which, because it...

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  • A cultural legacy: the theatre of ancient Greece

    Article

    Sometimes it is not easy to understand how the different units of the Key Stage 2 National Curriculum were selected, but this is not true for the Ancient Greek unit. Since the renaissance period, knowledge of ‘the classics’ has been a central element for an educated man or woman. Ancient...

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  • A history of the world - 100 objects that tell a story

    Article

    Editorial comment: A History of the World is the most creative, imaginative and dynamic development in primary History Education for thirty years. It ties in perfectly with and supports the government's re-vitalisation of primary education that the independent Cambridge Primary  Review and the Rose Review of the Primary Curriculum should...

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  • An Olympic Timeline

    Article

    IntroductionThe Olympic movement provides the prefect opportunity to consider the broad sweep of chronology linking ancient times to the present day, where children can find examples of both change and continuity over a long period of time (see Ferguson, 2011). This lesson idea, planned for Years 4/5, looks at how...

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  • Ancient Sumer

    Article

    For many teachers and children alike, Ancient Sumer will be completely new. Although Sumer has always been an option for teaching about Early Civilisations, the fame of Ancient Egypt, as well as being a tried-and-tested topic, has meant that Sumer has perhaps been overlooked. There is little danger of failing...

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  • Ankhu and Nebu of Deir el Medina

    Article

    Perhaps the hardest skill to develop in history is a sense of period. What was it really like to live in Ancient Egypt? Who should we study? Or, in this case, which workers were typical? Were these craftsmen in Deir el Medina typical of all the workers in Egypt? Or...

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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    The new Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment in Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 across schools in England....

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  • Britain from the Iron Age to Robin Hood

    Article

    ‘...if children are to ever fully appreciate history the development of historical time has to be central to our teaching methodologies' This lesson aims to provide an overview of this period, developing pupils' sense of chronology and their understanding of cause and consequence. The context for these ideas comes from...

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  • Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

    Article

    Anglo-Saxons have been a part of the primary national curriculum from the onset so they may not be as unfamiliar to teachers as some themes. Many teachers also report that pupils enjoy studying them so there is clearly much in their favour. That does not mean, however, that all is...

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  • Case Study 2: Creative chronological thinking

    Article

    Connecting with the pastPersonal biographiesI often ask groups to collect and record their own personal chronologies. They are asked to bring in evidence to tell the stories of their own lives or of the life of a relative, which they will then weave into a ‘photo book' story. The photo...

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  • Children's Thinking: Developmental psychology and history education

    Article

    Editorial note: Hilary Cooper outlines the main features of historical thinking. These ideas are embedded in the government's current requirements for teaching National Curriculum History [England]IntroductionIt is important that children develop a coherent, chronological understanding of the ‘big picture' of the past, of key events, people, movements and changes...

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  • Chronology & Topics at Key Stage 2

    Article

    The nearly complete history of almost everythingIntroduction

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  • Chronology - an Olympic timeline

    Article

    Pat Hoodless illuminates how chronology can provide a spine, a backbone and an ‘essential framework' to support and shape pupil learning of NC History...

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  • Chronology and local history: Year 6

    Article

    Editorial note: This short paper introduces a highly creative, imaginative and enthralling case-study of a local history project for year 6 pupils. The teaching programme has a chronological spine that provides coherence and focus. Chronology is one element in the pupils' ‘Doing History' that draws upon a full range of...

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  • Chronology through ICT

    Article

    Developing chronological understanding through the use of ICTIntroduction: Research into chronological understandingChronological understandingThis is both one of history's most important disciplinary organising concepts (Lee and Shemilt: 2004) required for developing a full understanding of history, and certainly one of the most researched, though often with a broader remit that just...

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  • Chronology: blank timelines

    Article

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  • Churches as a local historical source

    Article

    At Key Stage 1 children should learn about significant events, (e.g. the Great Fire of London) and about people and places in their locality. At Key Stage 2 they should learn about British settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots (e.g. Anglo-Saxon art and culture) and do a local history study (e.g....

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