Classroom Resources

These resources can take many forms but will be aimed at helping younger children explore historical concepts through their senses and developing their language and communication. For example, artefacts, visual images of various kinds, stories and people themselves all help younger children to explore ideas and work out problems for themselves and with support from informed adults.

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  • 'Doing Local History' through maps and drama

    Article

    Editorial note: John Fines produced two case studies of Local History for the Nuffield Primary History Project. One on them is published here for the first time.

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  • A History of the World: 100 objects that tell a story

    Article

    ‘A History of the World in 100 Objects' was the most creative, imaginative and dynamic development in primary History Education for thirty years. It ties in perfectly with and supports the government's draft NC for History.

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  • A Local History Toolkit

    Article

    IntroductionIn this short paper you will discover some of the tools for ‘doing' local history. They are based on where I live: you can get similar types of sources from where you live, work or teach. Your main source will be a local library or record office, but there is...

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  • A creative Egyptian project

    Article

    IntroductionIdeally when teaching history, teachers will look to deliver projects that will engage and motivate, hopefully making the hard work of being creative stimulating and rewarding, based upon questioning, enquiry, investigation of sources and reaching conclusions grounded in the evidence.Ancient Egypt is one of those history topics which, because it...

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  • A view from the KS1 classroom - investigating an artefact

    Article

    IntroductionIn the autumn of 2009 I saw some of the Anglo-Saxon Staffordshire Hoard on display at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, and stood in awe at the skills of the craftsmen. Reminded so vividly of the Anglo Saxon period I had briefly studied as a student, I sought out the...

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  • An Olympic Great? Dorando Pietri

    Article

    IntroductionThe Italian confectioner Dorando Pietri is one of the most famous figures from the 1908 Olympics - famous for not winning. His story raises issues of sportsmanship suitable for class discussion. There are detailed accounts readily available on the web...

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  • An Olympic Timeline

    Article

    IntroductionThe Olympic movement provides the prefect opportunity to consider the broad sweep of chronology linking ancient times to the present day, where children can find examples of both change and continuity over a long period of time (see Ferguson, 2011). This lesson idea, planned for Years 4/5, looks at how...

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  • Archaeology and the Early Years: The Noah's Ark Experience

    Article

    Background to the project The authors of this article first worked together on a number of small scale excavations while Bev was still a primary school teacher in the Bradford area. When Bev changed roles to train teachers at Leeds Trinity they were both keen to sustain the link. Dave...

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  • Artefacts and art facts: images of Sir Francis Drake

    Article

    Editorial note: This article reveals the power of the Internet in helping us all, adults and children, to bring portraits like Drake's to life. So, as you read, follow the links.

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  • Artefacts handling at Brunel's SS Great Britain

    Article

    Editorial note: This article introduces teachers to ss Great Britain as an artefactual teaching resource. It links closely to Teachers TV programmes, see page 30, and should be read in conjunction with them.

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  • Bring on the iPad revolution

    Article

    IntroductionThe opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic games celebrated change whilst demonstrating the challenges revolutions have on the world. From green pastures to belching chimneystacks, from post-war Britain to the World Wide Internet and text messaging, the way society interacts is changing at an incomprehensible rate.

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  • Case Study 1: Historical information and the local community

    Article

    Introduction - The ICT revolutionA paper register, a pink-lined A4 mark book and a written school log book are surely historical artefacts? The transition from paper to digital technology continues, changing the world of the classroom teacher whose working life like mine, began in the print age when digital-based education...

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  • Case Study 4: Hit the net!

    Article

    IntroductionPrimary History's editorial team set me the challenge of seeing how useful ICT would be in my teaching. The challenge was timely, as I recently inherited a Year Six History class with its unit of work "Life in Britain since the 1930s".Having taught predominantly KS1, this invoked both feelings of excitement...

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  • Celebrate your sporting heritage

    Article

    National Sporting Heritage Day takes place on 30 September every year. It aims to support schools and other community organisations to engage withtheir local sporting heritage, explore the heritage on their doorstep, celebrate and share the information that they find and inspire children and young people to find out more....

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  • Chronology through ICT

    Article

    Developing chronological understanding through the use of ICTIntroduction: Research into chronological understandingChronological understandingThis is both one of history's most important disciplinary organising concepts (Lee and Shemilt: 2004) required for developing a full understanding of history, and certainly one of the most researched, though often with a broader remit that just...

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  • Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge

    Article

    Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain's past and of the wider worldFirst, this article considers the reasons why it is essential for children to develop a chronological framework. Next it considers ways in which this framework is necessary for the development of the time concepts set out...

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  • Constructivist chronology and Horrible Histories

    Article

    IntroductionI chose Horrible Histories for this exploration of children's understanding of chronology because I thought it would be fun - and I approve of the Horrible Histories. They use sources, question sources, provide alternative interpretations and recognise what is not known and that historians are not always ‘right'. They give information...

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  • Doing History with Objects

    Article

    IntroductionI was talking about ‘Doing History' with historical artefacts and objects with a young teacher when she closed the discussion with the statement ‘It's alright for you, you're old, your house is full of old things - how do I get them?' Alas - I had to agree with her,...

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  • English Heritage's Heritage Explorer

    Article

    Diogenes - Waving not drowning: English Heritage's Heritage Explorer

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  • Every child matters: Addressing the needs of the child in learning about the past

    Article

    ‘Every Child Matters: Change for Children' and the ‘Children's Plan' The agenda of Every Child Matters: Change for Children (DfES 2004) is part of a long term programme of change with an emphasis on the needs of the individual child. The overall well-being of children and their achievement in school...

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