Controversial issues

History is not an easy subject as it is full of contradictions and challenging situations. It requires children to look at how people responded to complicated dilemmas. It also requires them to consider motivation. Looking at what people did in the past children to make links with present events. It requires children to evaluate the history of their own country and how it has interacted with other people. Read more

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  • Teaching sensitive subjects: slavery and Britain’s role in the trade

    Article

    See also: Teaching Slavery - HA guide Slavery in Britain Sarah Forbes Bonetta - scheme of work Teaching Emotive and Controversial History Diversity guidance for primary teachers and subject leaders Slavery is a part of our history, and its impact can be seen in the statues of influential men, the...

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  • Writing books for young children about the First World War

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 It is hardly surprising that there are very few books for young children which tackle such a difficult subject as the First World War. In considering our approach, we knew we had to balance two distinct considerations – being absolutely true to the facts, yet, being sensitive...

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  • Is There a Place for The Holocaust in the Primary Curriculum?

    Article

    The Holocaust – the murder of approximately six million Jewish men, women and children by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during the Second World War – is possibly the most difficult event that any history teacher will ever have to teach. Most obviously, it can be deeply upsetting, for educators...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Refugee stories

    Article

    An assembly could focus on the achievements of their lives, experiences as child refugees and migrants, and how they overcame their difficulties. Their stories can be compared and contrasted with other refugees, such as children from the Kindertransport and child refugees in Europe today. It is important that children understand the term ‘refugee’...

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  • Primary history and British values

    Article

    In this article, Michael Maddison provides an overview of what schools must do in relation to promoting British values, as well as preventing extremism and radicalisation, and why it is so important that opportunities are taken in history to  deal with these two pressing issues. It is an updated version...

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  • KS1: Teaching about significant individuals

    Article

    Teaching about significant individuals at Key Stage 1. Workshop by Professor Penelope Hartnett, University of the West of England The history programme of study for Key Stage 1 requires pupils to be taught about: The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, some...

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  • From Home to the Front: World War I

    Article

    Events which encapsulate family, community, national and global history provide rich opportunities for engaging children. Some of these draw on positive memories associated with past events: the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, how people responded to the first flight to the moon, the Millennium celebrations. Yet it is perhaps gruelling...

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  • Early Islamic civilisation

    Article

    The Primary National Curriculum pinpoints Early Islamic Civilisation as Baghdad c. AD 900 - yet it was so much more. For approximately a thousand years after AD 700 there was an extraordinary amount of activity that radiated out from Baghdad and along a glittering crescent through North Africa and into...

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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    The new Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment in Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 across schools in England....

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Lest we forget

    Article

    Over the next three editions of Primary History our assemblies pages will be linked to the theme of commemorating the First World War. We have found that while many teachers wish to remember these events in school, they are unsure how to approach the subject with primary aged children. It...

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  • Eweka's story: Benin and Big Picture History

    Article

    The prospect of teaching Benin as a non-European Study within the time frame 900-1300 AD is challenging! Traditional oral evidence  suggests that the critical event during this period in Benin's past was a transition from the Ogiso to the Eweka Dynasty, named after its first Oba, which resulted in it...

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  • T.E.A.C.H Online

    Multipage Article

    T.E.A.C.H. Online is a resource that follows on from the Historical Association's T.E.A.C.H. Report published in 2007 with support from DCSF. It offers further expert advice, case studies, materials and classroom resources for teachers of history on teaching emotive and controversial history from Foundation Stage to Key Stage 5. N.B....

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  • Is teaching about the Holocaust suitable for primary aged children?

    Article

    Case study 5: Is teaching about the Holocaust suitable for primary aged children?Editorial note: While this is a valuable paper, we must point out that the normal ethical procedures concerning such a sensitive, emotional subject must be followed in relation to pupils, their parents/carers and the wider community, i.e. the...

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  • Campaign: Make an impact and history

    Article

    Introduction: the role of history What is the role of history in the curriculum? Is it to give a traditional education or because history is a powerful teacher that we all can learn from? In my view well-taught history doesn't leave history in the past. It's easy to look purely...

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  • Pride in place: What does historical geographical and social understanding look like?

    Article

    Pride in place: What does historical geographical and social understanding look like?

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  • History, Citizenship & Controversy

    Article

    Y4 question their MP about nuclear waste policy; Y6 survey people in their community and school about a proposed casino in their town, and feed back the information to the local council; children decide to buy their Christmas presents and ask for their own presents to come from a Fair-trade...

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  • Primary history and the curriculum: a South African perspective

    Article

    The issues surrounding the construction of a post-conflict history curriculum are complex. At its most basic level, the memory choice for a country emerging from mass violence is between remembering and forgetting, with the critical question being what should be done with the knowledge  of the horrors of the past....

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  • TEACH Statement

    4th March 2008

    The TEACH report outlines the sort of good practice in teaching sensitive topics which is available for teachers to share, not least through the Historical Association's programme of subject-specific training. The Historical Association is disturbed to learn that false and misleading claims about the teaching of the Holocaust are being...

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  • The T.E.A.C.H. Project

    Article

    The report look at approaches that enable teachers to tackle these issues in ordinary lessons through rigorous and engaging teaching while at the same time challenging discrimination and prejudice.

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  • Citizenship, controversial issues and identity in the transition year

    Article

    Moving from one key stage to another is one of the major rites of passage for pupils, and can be a source of anxiety. Equally it can be a source of anticipation of adventures and different experiences ahead. More probably, for most pupils it can be a mixture of many...

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