Classroom Resources

The HA has spent a great deal of effort in developing resonant support for the Key Stage 2 curriculum. Most you will find here, especially the articles and reviews from Primary History. Read more

Sort by: Date (Newest first) | Title A-Z
Show: All | Articles | Podcasts | Multipage Articles
  • Our Iron Age challenge

    Article

    The University of Chichester’s three-year BA (Hons) Degree for Primary Education and Teaching involves learning how to provide rigorous and creative educational opportunities for children. The course involves one creativity module each year. The final one involves the development of skills and confidence in creating problem-solving. Four of us were...

    Click to view
  • Using shoes as an historical source

    Article

    There is something fascinating about what people wore in the past. From corsets to clogs, the evolution of clothing and footwear can give an insight into different periods of history, an excellent way of engaging with the past. Shoes, in some form or another, have been around from the earliest...

    Click to view
  • Primary history and British values

    Article

    In this article, Michael Maddison provides an overview of what schools must do in relation to promoting British values, as well as preventing extremism and radicalisation, and why it is so important that opportunities are taken in history to  deal with these two pressing issues. It is an updated version...

    Click to view
  • What can you do with a Victorian Trade Directory…?

    Article

    What is a trade directory? Trade directories are the equivalent of the telephone directory and the Yellow Pages. They were published on a county or city basis every year and contain detailed descriptions of every village and town in the county. They also contain pages and pages of advertisements, for...

    Click to view
  • From the Iron Age to Robin Hood

    Article

    Who lived in and changed Britain from the Iron Age to the time of Robin Hood c. 1200? ‘...if children are to ever fully appreciate history the development of historical time has to be central to our teaching methodologies' Introduction This lesson aims to provide an overview of this period, developing...

    Click to view
  • Never Such Innocence - WW1 Resource

    Article

    Never Such Innocence is pleased to publish the second edition of its resource pack for primary and secondary school pupils. As well as a timeline and useful information on the different fronts of the First World War, the pack includes pages on the part played by Scotland, the Crown Dependencies,...

    Click to view
  • What your local Archive Service can offer to schools

    Article

    Imagine a place where your pupils become detectives working on mysteries from the past such as the tale of Thomas Sargeant, a 15-year-old factory worker who died in a chemical works in 1898. Your local archive is bursting with stories about real people like this which can give children an...

    Click to view
  • Ancient Sumer

    Article

    For many teachers and children alike, Ancient Sumer will be completely new. Although Sumer has always been an option for teaching about Early Civilisations, the fame of Ancient Egypt, as well as being a tried-and-tested topic, has meant that Sumer has perhaps been overlooked. There is little danger of failing...

    Click to view
  • From Home to the Front: World War I

    Article

    Events which encapsulate family, community, national and global history provide rich opportunities for engaging children. Some of these draw on positive memories associated with past events: the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, how people responded to the first flight to the moon, the Millennium celebrations. Yet it is perhaps gruelling...

    Click to view
  • Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England

    Article

    The Vikings will be familiar territory to many primary teachers. For many, therefore, this section of the history curriculum should cause fewer headaches than others. This does not mean, however, that it is all straightforward. This article contains a number of elements that teachers might welcome including a timeline of...

    Click to view
  • Pull-out Posters: Primary History 69

    Article

    Click to view
  • Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

    Article

    Briefing Anglo-Saxons have been a part of the primary national curriculum from the onset so they may not be as unfamiliar to teachers as some themes. Many teachers also report that pupils enjoy studying them so there is clearly much in their favour. That does not mean, however, that all...

    Click to view
  • Ideas for Assemblies: Lest we forget

    Article

    Over the next three editions of Primary History our assemblies pages will be linked to the theme of commemorating the First World War. We have found that while many teachers wish to remember these events in school, they are unsure how to approach the subject with primary aged children. It...

    Click to view
  • Investigating the Indus Valley (2600-1900 B.C.)

    Article

    IntroductionIn 1924 The Illustrated London News broke the story of a sensational discovery in the Indian subcontinent. Ruined mounds at Mohenjodaro and Harappa, 600 km apart, were forgotten cities of a lost civilisation. Nearly all we know about the Indus Civilisation comes from archaeology. What survives leaves many unanswered questions,...

    Click to view
  • The Maya: a 4,000-year-old civilisation in the Americas

    Article

    Obscured by the fame of the Aztec empire or shrouded by a veil of mystery, the cultural history of the Maya has generally been misunderstood by the British public. Maya civilisation developed in a territory the size of Germany and Denmark together (nearly 400,000 km2). This vast territory shows three...

    Click to view
  • Using the back cover image: Sandbach Crosses - an Anglo-Saxon market cross

    Article

    This image is a reconstruction, or interpretation, by Peter Dunn, an artist, of what Sandbach Crosses might have looked like in the ninth century. They are one of the few remaining Anglo-Saxon stone crosses in the country. They stand in the market place in Sandbach, Cheshire. You can find a...

    Click to view
  • Place-names and the National Curriculum for History

    Article

    IntroductionPlace-names, such as house or school names, are infinite in number and all around us. Every place-name may convey a message about the place. Often place-names record and celebrate local and national people, events and incidents, define what a place looked like in the past and how we used to...

    Click to view
  • War memorials as a local history resource

    Article

    War Memorials Trust (WMT) is the charity that works for the protection and conservation of war memorials in the UK. It defines a war memorial as ‘any physical object created, erected or installed to commemorate those involved in or affected by a conflict or war' (WMT 2009, ‘Definition of a...

    Click to view
  • Curriculum Planning: which non-European society might we offer at school?

    Article

    A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - one study. chosen from:early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900;Mayan civilization c. AD 900;Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.That's quite clear then - there's a choice between early Islam, Central America or Africa. All of which...

    Click to view
  • Victorians

    Article

    The Victorians is a much-loved unit of work in many schools and some teachers were disappointed to see it had been removed but there are still ways to continue to teach it under the new National Curriculum. In many localities there will be a huge variety of Victorian buildings -...

    Click to view