Classroom Resources

The HA has spent a great deal of effort in developing resonant support for the Key Stage 2 curriculum. Most you will find here, especially the articles and reviews from Primary History. Read more

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  • Teaching Ancient Egypt

    Article

    Editorial note: This paper has two sections: first, a background briefing about Ancient Egypt with a timeline and map that introduces the second section's three teaching activities on: building the Great Pyramid of Giza; Hatshepsut, Egypt's great woman pharaoh; and Akhenaten and his attempt to revolutionise Egyptian religion. ‘Hail to thee, O...

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  • Stone Age to Iron Age - overview and depth

    Article

    Introduction Stone Age to Iron Age covers around 10,000 years, between the last Ice Age and the coming of the Romans. Such a long period is difficult for children to imagine, but putting the children into a living time-line across the classroom might help. In one sense not a lot...

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  • Using the back cover image: Windmill Hill

    Article

    The back cover image is a reconstruction of prehistoric life based on the English Heritage site Windmill Hill. Such images are of great value to the teacher in bringing the distant past to life, and in deepening pupil understanding of its historical significance. Using these sorts of illustrations can help...

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  • Slavery in Britain

    Article

    Slavery in Britain and the portrait of Dido Belle and Lady Elizabeth MurrayIntroductionImages reflect the social customs and attitudes of the society in which they are produced, and we may nowdisapprove of these attitudes. Conversely, our own ideas of what is right and wrong may well have been unacceptable in...

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  • The world on the wall: exploring diversity on Hadrian's Wall

    Article

    Built in AD 122 by the order of the Emperor Hadrian, the 73 mile (80 Roman miles) long frontier goes from Bownesson-Solway in Cumbria to Wallsend on the River Tyne. Since 1987, the area has been inscribed as a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) World Heritage Site.Soldiers...

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  • Political literacy: citizenship through the English national curriculum's the Romans in Britain study unit

    Article

    Hilary Claire raised fundamental issues about the relationship between History and Citizenship for the development of a sense of identity. Her paper stresses the importance of sceptical thinking, perspective, sequence and progression - the essential chronology that underpins pupil's education for citizenship in the timeframe that history provides...

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  • A History of the World: 100 objects that tell a story

    Article

    ‘A History of the World in 100 Objects' was the most creative, imaginative and dynamic development in primary History Education for thirty years. It ties in perfectly with and supports the government's draft NC for History.

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  • Helping pupils to view historical film critically

    Article

    Pointing the view: Helping pupils to view historical film criticallyIntroduction The teaching potential of film Films about historical events seem like the nearest thing we can give our pupils to a time machine. In commercial film, the physical appearance of the past has often been carefully researched, thus a snippet...

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  • A creative Egyptian project

    Article

    IntroductionIdeally when teaching history, teachers will look to deliver projects that will engage and motivate, hopefully making the hard work of being creative stimulating and rewarding, based upon questioning, enquiry, investigation of sources and reaching conclusions grounded in the evidence.Ancient Egypt is one of those history topics which, because it...

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  • In My View: Creativity & History

    Article

    Introduction A great deal has been written recently defining what is meant by creativity in primary education. And much has been written urging us to ‘teach creatively'. Yet there had been no exploration of what teaching creatively means in terms of teaching history until a group of colleagues and I...

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  • History, ICT and the digital age

    Article

    Three things are important1.Don't fall for the hypeYou are not a bad teacher if you are not using a lot of technology in history or any other area! Research evidence does not support many of the claims made about technology." Most of the evidence we have is anecdotal or in...

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  • The digital revolution

    Article

    Developments in information technology continue at an extraordinary pace. Many young children will have little or no idea of what it was like to live in a world without mobile phones, computers and the Internet. Most children will regularly make use of devices such as smart phones, digital cameras and...

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  • The Interactive Whiteboard or Smart Board

    Article

    History and the digital age: The Interactive Whiteboard or Smart BoardThe interactive whiteboard [smartboard] has opened a pathway to explore sources and develop historical interest for children of all ages. It can be used in varied ways that allow a teacher to customise activities to match their intended outcomes. Support for...

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  • Chronology through ICT

    Article

    Developing chronological understanding through the use of ICTIntroduction: Research into chronological understandingChronological understandingThis is both one of history's most important disciplinary organising concepts (Lee and Shemilt: 2004) required for developing a full understanding of history, and certainly one of the most researched, though often with a broader remit that just...

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  • Bring on the iPad revolution

    Article

    Introduction The opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic games celebrated change whilst demonstrating the challenges revolutions have on the world. From green pastures to belching chimneystacks, from post-war Britain to the World Wide Internet and text messaging, the way society interacts is changing at an incomprehensible rate. The same could...

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  • Case Study 4: Hit the net!

    Article

    IntroductionPrimary History's editorial team set me the challenge of seeing how useful ICT would be in my teaching. The challenge was timely, as I recently inherited a Year Six History class with its unit of work "Life in Britain since the 1930s".Having taught predominantly KS1, this invoked both feelings of excitement...

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  • Case Study 1: Historical information and the local community

    Article

    Introduction - The ICT revolutionA paper register, a pink-lined A4 mark book and a written school log book are surely historical artefacts? The transition from paper to digital technology continues, changing the world of the classroom teacher whose working life like mine, began in the print age when digital-based education...

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  • English Heritage's Heritage Explorer

    Article

    Diogenes - Waving not drowning: English Heritage's Heritage Explorer

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  • Constructivist chronology and Horrible Histories

    Article

    IntroductionI chose Horrible Histories for this exploration of children's understanding of chronology because I thought it would be fun - and I approve of the Horrible Histories. They use sources, question sources, provide alternative interpretations and recognise what is not known and that historians are not always ‘right'. They give information...

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  • Scene shifting: Using visulas for chronology

    Article

    IntroductionVivid pictures from and of the past, its material culture, can be stimulating and effective tools for teaching chronology. Their use is not, however, straightforward. Children bring into school mental images and stereotypes about the past acquired from their environment and from the media. Interesting research has explored young children's...

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