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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    Assessment and Progression without levels: where do we go from here? The new Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies

    Article

    Over the next three editions of Primary History our assemblies pages will be linked to the theme of commemorating the First World War. We have found that while many teachers wish to remember these events in school, they are unsure how to approach the subject with primary aged children. It...

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  • What do we mean by Big Picture History?

    Article

    Perhaps the best way to start thinking about Big Picture history is to say what it is not - it is not about rote learning dates or remembering ‘famous people and events' - Alfred the Great, The Battle of Hastings, Henry VIII, Florence Nightingale ....and so on! This factual knowledge...

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  • Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

    Article

    Briefing Anglo-Saxons have been a part of the primary national curriculum from the onset so they may not be as unfamiliar to teachers as some themes. Many teachers also report that pupils enjoy studying them so there is clearly much in their favour. That does not mean, however, that all...

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  • Investigating the Indus Valley (2600-1900 B.C.)

    Article

    IntroductionIn 1924 The Illustrated London News broke the story of a sensational discovery in the Indian subcontinent. Ruined mounds at Mohenjodaro and Harappa, 600 km apart, were forgotten cities of a lost civilisation. Nearly all we know about the Indus Civilisation comes from archaeology. What survives leaves many unanswered questions,...

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  • The Maya: a 4,000-year-old civilisation in the Americas

    Article

    Obscured by the fame of the Aztec empire or shrouded by a veil of mystery, the cultural history of the Maya has generally been misunderstood by the British public. Maya civilisation developed in a territory the size of Germany and Denmark together (nearly 400,000 km2). This vast territory shows three...

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  • Using the back cover image Sandbach Crosses: an Anglo-Saxon market cross

    Article

    This image is a reconstruction, or interpretation, by Peter Dunn, an artist, of what Sandbach Crosses might have looked like in the ninth century. They are one of the few remaining Anglo-Saxon stone crosses in the country. They stand in the market place in Sandbach, Cheshire. You can find a...

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  • Place-names and the National Curriculum for History

    Article

    IntroductionPlace-names, such as house or school names, are infinite in number and all around us. Every place-name may convey a message about the place. Often place-names record and celebrate local and national people, events and incidents, define what a place looked like in the past and how we used to...

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  • Eweka's story: Benin, Big Picture History

    Article

    Eweka's story: Benin, Big Picture History and the National Curriculum for History 2014 The prospect of teaching Benin as a non-European Study within the time frame 900-1300 AD is challenging! Traditional oral evidence  suggests that the critical event during this period in Benin's past was a transition from the Ogiso...

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  • Teaching Ancient Egypt

    Article

    [editorial note The paper has two sections: a background briefing about Ancient Egypt with a timeline and map that introduces the second section's three teaching activities on: 1. building the Great Pyramid of Giza, 2. Hatshepsut, Egypt's great woman pharaoh and 3. Akhenaten and his attempt to revolutionise Egyptian religion.]Briefing:...

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  • Stone Age to Iron Age - overview and depth

    Article

    IntroductionStone Age to Iron Age covers around 10,000 years, between the last Ice Age and the coming of the Romans. Such a long period is difficult for children to imagine, but putting the children into a living time-line across the classroom might help. In one sense not a lot happens...

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  • Mesopotamia: Making a picture of Mesopotamia in our heads

    Article

    IntroductionWorking in a small rural primary school in North Gloucestershire I was inspired by national news reports from Iraq to change the focus of our Ancient History study from Ancient Egypt to Mesopotamia, ‘the land between the rivers'. A study of this region of the Middle East fulfilled so many...

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  • Political literacy: citizenship through the English national curriculum's the Romans in Britain study unit

    Article

    Hilary Claire raised fundamental issues about the relationship between History and Citizenship for the development of a sense of identity. Her paper stresses the importance of sceptical thinking, perspective, sequence and progression - the essential chronology that underpins pupil's education for citizenship in the timeframe that history provides...

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  • A creative Egyptian project

    Article

    IntroductionIdeally when teaching history, teachers will look to deliver projects that will engage and motivate, hopefully making the hard work of being creative stimulating and rewarding, based upon questioning, enquiry, investigation of sources and reaching conclusions grounded in the evidence.Ancient Egypt is one of those history topics which, because it...

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  • In My View: Creativity & History

    Article

    Introduction A great deal has been written recently defining what is meant by creativity in primary education. And much has been written urging us to ‘teach creatively'. Yet there had been no exploration of what teaching creatively means in terms of teaching history until a group of colleagues and I...

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  • Thematic or topic based whole school curriculum planning

    Article

    Case Study 1: Creative approaches to thematic or topic based whole school curriculum planningIntroductionCreative curricular planning With the National Curriculum under review, it seems that more schools are taking a creative approach to planning by delivering the curriculum through a focused theme or topic. This has allowed schools to take more...

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  • Chronology & Topics at Key Stage 2

    Article

    The nearly complete history of almost everythingIntroduction

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  • Enhancing temporal cognition

    Article

    Practical activities for the primary classroom

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  • From Champion to Hero: Engaging Pupils in a study of significant Olympians

    Article

    IntroductionAllocated the task of researching and presenting ideas for teaching about significant Olympians, I thought: ‘Brilliant, this is the easy one'. How wrong can one be! I expected to be able to access a plethora of child-friendly resources devoted to my Olympic heroes like Mary Peters, Seb Coe and Steve...

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  • Primary History and planning for teaching the Olympics - four curricular models

    Article

    IntroductionThree of the most recent curricular editions of Primary History, PH 50, Autumn 2008 , PH 53, Autumn 2009 and PH 57, Spring 2011 are directly relevant to teaching the Olympics.PH 50, Autumn 2008 History Education in the 21st Century  Primary Curriculum raised the issues surrounding history's possible role in...

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