Enquiries

Section Guide

Sort by: Date (Newest first) | Title A-Z
Show: All | Articles | Podcasts | Multipage Articles
  • Investigating the ancient olympic games: A Case Study

    Article

    IntroductionIn a 10-week unit on Ancient Greece, we gave the fourth lesson over to the ancient Olympic Games. The class was a delight: 32 enthusiastic Year 6 children in an urban county primary school.We knew the children would have concepts of the Olympics gained from the modern games. So, we...

    Click to view
  • Willaim Brookes and the Olympic Games

    Article

    IntroductionHistory flows like a river, sometimes quiet and unobtrusive, sometimes a raging torrent with wide-ranging effects on the world around us. It is punctuated by momentous events and significant individuals, who impact on its direction and form for the future. As a curriculum subject, history can be approached through significant...

    Click to view
  • Shropshire's Secret Olympic History

    Article

    IntroductionWhat has a small Shropshire town got to do with the modern Olympic Games? Why is a country doctor a key figure in the development of the modern games? Why is one of the 2012 mascots named Wenlock? These questions and more are being explored through materials developed to support...

    Click to view
  • Local History and the 2012 Olympics - Mel Jones

    Article

    IntroductionWith the 2012 London Olympics rapidly approaching, you are probably marvelling at what a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity this is and what amazing classroom teaching opportunities it might bring.You have probably already been inundated with ideas for your history lessons linking the Olympic movement to specific curriculum areas such as the Ancient...

    Click to view
  • Learning to engage with documents through role play

    Article

    IntroductionFirst let me say that I did not research the materials used or plan this lesson. For this I must acknowledge, with thanks, that this is the work of my colleague, Mike Huggins, and the senior assistant archivist in the Cumbrian Record office, Margaret Owen. However, I subsequently taught this...

    Click to view
  • A history of the world - 100 objects that tell a story

    Article

    Editorial comment: A History of the World is the most creative, imaginative and dynamic development in primary History Education for thirty years. It ties in perfectly with and supports the government's re-vitalisation of primary education that the independent Cambridge Primary  Review and the Rose Review of the Primary Curriculum should...

    Click to view
  • History in the Urban Environment

    Article

    IntroductionA study of the local environment can make a vital contribution to children's sense of identity, their sense of place and the community in which they live. More importantly, a local study can enable children to develop a sense of value and respect for the quality of their local environment,...

    Click to view
  • Hearts, Hamsters and Historic Education

    Article

    This is a reflection on a project, set up with a variety of different thoughts about education in its widest sense. Or, to put it another way, a primary school teacher's record of a unique opportunity to turn education as we know it upside down and look at it from...

    Click to view
  • Learning what a place does and what we do for it

    Article

    Why teach children about architecture and the built environment?Because they shape the future and because they already change our architecture and define the public realm everyday through their actions. Learning about architecture and the built environment should not only be attached to lessons in geometry or history which help us...

    Click to view
  • Cross Curricular Project on a famous person

    Article

    IntroductionIf you are considering studying someone other than Florence Nightingale you have two basic options. You can either choose a local character who would be more relevant to the children, or you could study someone who you think would be an inspiration to your children. We wanted to fulfil the...

    Click to view
  • Pride in place: What does historical geographical and social understanding look like?

    Article

    Pride in place: What does historical geographical and social understanding look like?

    Click to view
  • Nuffield Promary History and classroom archaeology

    Article

    Classroom archaeology. The ideal way to incorporate archaeology into primary education is to carry out real excavations with children. However, outdoor excavations or site visits are not always possible. It is then that we can turn to classroom archaeology, bringing archaeological excavations to life through simulation. Lessons simulating archaeological excavations...

    Click to view
  • Children's thinking in archaeology

    Article

    Introduction:Young children enjoy prehistory Tactile, Physical and Enactive engagement with archaeological remains stimulates, excites and promotes children's logical, imaginative, creative and deductive thinking. Through archaeology there are infinite opportunities for ‘reasonable guesses' about sources and what they tell us about their owners. Sites where Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze and Iron...

    Click to view
  • Here come the Vikings! Making a saga out of a crisis,

    Article

    IntroductionWhat are your first impressions when you think of Alfred the Great? Perhaps it's the story of the heroic individual being humbled by burning the cakes or for those of a certain age, it may be the image of David Hemmings saving England from the Vikings (Alfred the Great, MGM,...

    Click to view
  • Thinking through history: assessment and learning for the gifted young historian

    Article

    Historical enquiry requires reasoning. Even historical imagination depends on being able to evaluate a number of possible responses to an hypothesis and mastery of detail and argument. The high levels of thinking in history of gifted young historians can only result from challenging and stimulating teaching, which allows time for...

    Click to view
  • Stories about people: narrative, imagined biography and citizenship in the key stage 2 curriculum

    Article

    For children history is a story, and a story mainly about people.(Schools Council, 1969, p12) It is interesting that Grant Bage (1999) used this quote to begin his chapter on Making Meaning of Story and History in, what has become, the definitive book on learning history through narrative in primary...

    Click to view
  • Promoting talk during history lessons

    Article

    There are various reasons why pupils should be offered the opportunity to converse together during history. It can definitely be enjoyable for pupils to talk together and it helps to teach children how to share ideas. Pupils talking while working in a group may also use their peers' talk to...

    Click to view
  • After the sirens sounded: Event Framing and Counterfactuals at Key Stage 2

    Article

    The ‘imagined’ past presents as many problems for historians as it does for the teachers of history - how much of the past can we truly know? To what degree is the historiological process an exercise in the historical imagination? How much of the past have we licence to imagine?...

    Click to view
  • Looking at buildings as a source for developing historical enquiries

    Article

    Buildings offer a fascinating insight into history. We live, work and shop in buildings of various descriptions. Some of these buildings are very new, others are very old. Frequently new shop frontages disguise very old buildings and it is only by looking up that we can identify the older parts...

    Click to view
  • Keeping the content manageable in Key Stage 2

    Article

    This section offers guidance on how Key Stage 2 history can be organised through the use of a number of key investigative questions for the most commonly taught areas of study.

    Click to view