Living Memory

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  • Living Memory

    Information

    Studying events within living memory can help young children to gain an early understanding of chronology and that history is made all of the time. It also helps them to understand the world and their place within it. Through this Key Stage 1 unit of study, children are introduced to...

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  • Is There a Place for The Holocaust in the Primary Curriculum?

    Article

    The Holocaust – the murder of approximately six million Jewish men, women and children by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during the Second World War – is possibly the most difficult event that any history teacher will ever have to teach. Most obviously, it can be deeply upsetting, for educators...

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  • ‘Not again!’ - an additional viewpoint on using railways

    Article

    ‘Not again!’ I can remember my son muttering as his football thudded against the kitchen wall, ‘I went there in Year 2 and then in Year 4 and now I have to go there again in Year 6.’ He was referring to his school trips to the remains of the gunpowder factories in our village,...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Refugee stories

    Article

    An assembly could focus on the achievements of their lives, experiences as child refugees and migrants, and how they overcame their difficulties. Their stories can be compared and contrasted with other refugees, such as children from the Kindertransport and child refugees in Europe today. It is important that children understand the term ‘refugee’...

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  • Learning about the past through a study of houses and homes

    Article

    A thematic study based on houses and homes is an excellent way to link learning about the past with something all children will be able to relate to – where they live. Planned carefully, it can provide a range of learning opportunities for both inside and outside the classroom. Let’s look outside Learning about houses...

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  • Learning about the past through ‘ourselves and our families’

    Article

    ‘Ourselves and our families’ is a popular theme in foundation settings and Reception classes. It is often undertaken at the beginning of the academic year, although it can be taught later when teachers have a better understanding of children’s home circumstances. This theme can provide many opportunities for children to...

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  • The past through toys and games

    Article

    A learning theme centred on toys and games is perfect for younger children as the Early Years curriculum is, of course, all about learning through play. Planned carefully, it can also provide many opportunities for children to develop their understanding of the past. Adult-directed learning opportunities Provide the children with...

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  • Role play and the past

    Article

    The role-play area is often the most popular feature of a foundation stage classroom. For children, it's a source of great fun; for Early Years teachers, it is a wonderful way to develop pupils' language, communication and social development skills. An effective role-play area can also be instrumental in helping...

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  • Planning for 'Changes within Living Memory'

    Article

    While changes to the Key Stage 1 subject content are not as extensive as Key Stage 2 it is necessary to be aware of the changing emphasis within the different themes. ‘Changes within Living Memory' has a couple of key issues to be aware of. First, ‘living memory' refers to...

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  • Using 'Development Matters' in the Foundation stage

    Article

    Using ‘Development Matters' to plan learning for history in the Foundation stageYou won't find the term history in the Early Years curriculum framework at all. That being so, it can be difficult to know how best to support our Nursery and Reception colleagues when developing historical understanding within the Foundation...

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  • Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge

    Article

    Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain's past and of the wider worldFirst, this article considers the reasons why it is essential for children to develop a chronological framework. Next it considers ways in which this framework is necessary for the development of the time concepts set out...

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  • World War II evacuation project - A living history experience

    Article

    Editorial note: The WOW factor. When we first received and read the World War II Evacuation Project case study we simply went WOW! It was genuinely mind-blowing. Below we publish the main sections of the report. They bring to life an invaluable, ground-breaking case-study of national significance. The case-study involved...

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  • Learning to engage with documents through role play

    Article

    IntroductionFirst let me say that I did not research the materials used or plan this lesson. For this I must acknowledge, with thanks, that this is the work of my colleague, Mike Huggins, and the senior assistant archivist in the Cumbrian Record office, Margaret Owen. However, I subsequently taught this...

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  • Using classic fiction to support the study of childhood in Victorian times

    Article

    Editorial comment: Classic fiction provides useful sources of information for investigating the lives, beliefs and values of people in the past. In this article Ann Cowling describes activities undertaken with student teachers which may also serve as models for classroom work with children.

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  • Oral history - a source of evidence for the primary classroom

    Article

    IntroductionTo help children develop a more rounded awareness of historical understanding, they should have the opportunity to examine different types of evidence. The National Curriculum states that, "children should recognise that the past is represented and interpreted in different ways, and, to give reasons for this," (1999, p.105). These objectives can...

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  • A history of the world - 100 objects that tell a story

    Article

    Editorial comment: A History of the World is the most creative, imaginative and dynamic development in primary History Education for thirty years. It ties in perfectly with and supports the government's re-vitalisation of primary education that the independent Cambridge Primary  Review and the Rose Review of the Primary Curriculum should...

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  • History...about lives and living

    Article

    Let me start with a personal experience and then move on to a classroom example. I went to Paris for a few days recently and sat in the bar where Hemingway used to drink with Scott Fitzgerald in the 1920's. I have read their books and know something of their...

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  • Exploring our roots: oral history in the local community

    Article

    Death is one of the most sensitive and controversial issues that teachers encounter, linked inextricably as it is to identity. I think it sometimes escapes our attention that, as teachers of history, we constantly deal with the dead. They are the source of our studies and the substance of much...

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  • Introducing history at Key Stage 1: a view from the classroom

    Article

    ‘What are we doing this for?’ I was asked this question as we entered the churchyard to look at the local War memorial. The curiosity and directness of a six year old child is guaranteed to pull one up short. there is no hiding place here, and I wished I...

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  • Think Bubble - Being Old

    Article

    I recently had a most interesting conversation with a four year old about the age of an artefact she was looking at. The object was a darning mushroom – almost an icon in itself for primary school teachers these days! – and she was giving it most suspicious scrutiny. In...

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