Progression & Assessment

Monitoring children’s progression in history and planning for assessment in this subject is vital. These processes ensure that children’s attainment in history is examined by teachers which enable them to help children make progress in history. Read more

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  • Tracking pupil progress

    Article

    Assessment issues crop up with regularity in the pages of this journal. They have also been mentioned frequently in inspections and in the schools assessed for the Quality Mark. The problem with some of the recommendations is that they anticipate massive amounts of time and energy being devoted to it...

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  • Whole-school planning for progression

    Article

    How do we do the best for our children and for history?The challenge for subject leaders and school leadership teams continues to be managing the tension between what history has to offer your vision for learning and your children's entitlement to a high-quality history education. The new national curriculum has...

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  • KS1: Teaching about significant individuals

    Article

    Teaching about significant individuals at Key Stage 1. Workshop by Professor Penelope Hartnett, University of the West of England The history programme of study for Key Stage 1 requires pupils to be taught about: The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, some...

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  • The importance of history vocabulary

    Article

    Beyond phonics! Terminology for historyTeachers and schools should surely be forgiven for quickly turning to the pages containing the ‘subject content' - within the new history curriculum - and finding out ‘what' they should be teaching. This is especially true for Key Stage 2 where children must now learn British...

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  • From Home to the Front: World War I (1914-18)

    Article

    From Home to the Front: World War I (1914-18) in the primary school classroom Events which encapsulate family, community, national and global history provide rich opportunities for engaging children. Some of these draw on positive memories associated with past events: the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, how people responded to...

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  • Using 'Development Matters' in the Foundation stage

    Article

    Using ‘Development Matters' to plan learning for history in the Foundation stageYou won't find the term history in the Early Years curriculum framework at all. That being so, it can be difficult to know how best to support our Nursery and Reception colleagues when developing historical understanding within the Foundation...

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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    Assessment and Progression without levels: where do we go from here? The new Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment...

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  • Implementing the new curriculum in Year 2

    Article

    A first attempt at implementing the new curriculum in Year 2 The chance to pilot the new National Curriculum presented me with the opportunity I was looking for to revamp a tired Year 2 curriculum. I began teaching in Year 2 two years ago, having previously spent five years working...

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  • Progression from EYFS to Key Stage 3

    Article

    Thinking About Progression in the new history curriculum: Progression from EYFS to Key Stage 3 The removal of National Curriculum levels has left many schools and teachers scratching their heads and wondering how to proceed. National Curriculum levels have been used and misused in the past to both define progress...

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  • Assessment in Primary History - Guidance

    Multipage Article

    Whilst a number of schools have had well-considered assessment procedures for primary history, these represented a minority.  With the new national curriculum, the old level descriptions have been replaced by a single sentence attainment target which states that "by the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know,...

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  • Progression & Assessment without Levels - Guide

    Multipage Article

    In the new national curriculum for primary and secondary history one of the key differences is that, for the first time since 1991, there are no level descriptions against which you can assess pupils' progress.  The new attainment target says simply that: ‘By the end of each key stage, pupils...

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  • Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge

    Article

    Chronology: Developing a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain's past and of the wider worldFirst, this article considers the reasons why it is essential for children to develop a chronological framework. Next it considers ways in which this framework is necessary for the development of the time concepts set out...

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  • Why stories?

    Article

    During the Early Years and Foundation Stage children should listen to stories, ask how and why and talk about the past (DfE 2012). Young children are comfortable with stories. Through stories children extend their knowledge. They create new worlds through the powers of imagination. Stories allow children to move from...

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  • The new history curriculum: assessing learning and progression

    Article

    Workshop Materials from Annual Conference 2014The new history curriculum: assessing learning and progressionSteve Davy - Teacher at The Wroxham School and HA Primary Committee

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  • Teaching History Curriculum Supplement 2014

    Article

    Although modifications to the content of the National Curriculum for history have not been as dramatic as once feared, the effective revocation of the previous attainment target is radical indeed. When these changes are considered alongside the fact that more than half of maintained secondary schools (all academies and free...

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  • The Great Fire of London

    Article

    IntroductionThe Great Fire of London is a favourite National Curriculum teaching topic. This paper draws on the latest resources and teaching ideas to suggest how you can meet both the NC history requirements and the wider ones of the National Curriculum, particularly in integrated programmes that include teaching about the...

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  • Progression and coherence in history

    Article

    Introduction"The focus for much of the planning and the teaching is on pockets of knowledge at basic levels. Thus, the notion that pupils can progress and do better over time in history is not well established in all schools." (Ofsted, 2007)Successive Ofsted reports have noted that, in many primary schools,...

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  • Monitoring, assessment, recording and reporting

    Article

    Introduction Much of the recent guidance related to assessment, monitoring and recording in primary history has focused more on what does NOT have to be done rather than on practical advice on what might be done. Given the general sentiment of the current coalition government it is unlikely that there...

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  • Literacy Time Plus+ My Writing Progress Record

    Article

    Synopsis: Self-assessment sheets for Early Years literacy, which the child completes in discussion with the teacher. Review: This would be useful if Early Years staff have not got any other assessment strategy in place. It contains colour sheets for the child to complete, stating what level they are on and...

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  • Helping students make sense of historical time

    Article

    Once upon a time, educators believed that there was a property of children’s minds known as ‘understanding of time’. According to this belief, young children had little ability to understand when things happened, even within their own immediate experiences, much less in the distant past. As they got older, their...

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