Survive & Thrive

In a landscape in which history does not receive a great deal of initial teacher education training time, if any at all, on primary training routes, we have produced our own guide to surviving and thriving as a primary history teacher. Written by two trainee primary teachers, in the final year of their course, this guide takes you through those all important observations and experiences that will help you to survive your initial experiences of teaching history in the primary classroom

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  • Help! I am a new co-ordinator: when should I do what?

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 It would be pleasant to give an easy answer and produce a recommended calendar for all co-ordinators. The problem is that every school is different, the roles and expectations of co-ordinators vary and some years are different to others. Some co-ordinators have time to fulfil roles...

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  • What confuses primary pupils in history? Part 2

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 Part 1 of this article looked at some of the main areas of confusion that often characterise primary pupils’ historical thinking. Part 2 continues this theme by looking at three more key areas of misunderstanding and possible strategies to help improve their understanding: Confusion 4: Not really grasping...

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  • Survive and Thrive as a Primary History Trainee and NQT

    Article

    As a primary trainee or NQT, you might be faced with a situation in which you are expected to teach history having received little or no subject specific training. Our new guide Survive and Thrive as a Primary History Trainee and NQT has been written by trainee and early career...

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  • Ancient Sumer

    Article

    For many teachers and children alike, Ancient Sumer will be completely new. Although Sumer has always been an option for teaching about Early Civilisations, the fame of Ancient Egypt, as well as being a tried-and-tested topic, has meant that Sumer has perhaps been overlooked. There is little danger of failing...

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  • From Home to the Front: World War I

    Article

    Events which encapsulate family, community, national and global history provide rich opportunities for engaging children. Some of these draw on positive memories associated with past events: the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, how people responded to the first flight to the moon, the Millennium celebrations. Yet it is perhaps gruelling...

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  • Using cemeteries as a local history resource

    Article

    Why visit a cemetery as part of the history curriculum? Local studies now feature prominently in the primary history curriculum for both key stages. This development challenges teachers to find easilyaccessible, inexpensive and relevant resources on their doorstep. A rich resource which has traditionally been overlooked is the local churchyard...

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  • Early Islamic civilisation

    Article

    The Primary National Curriculum pinpoints Early Islamic Civilisation as Baghdad c. AD 900 - yet it was so much more. For approximately a thousand years after AD 700 there was an extraordinary amount of activity that radiated out from Baghdad and along a glittering crescent through North Africa and into...

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  • Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England

    Article

    The Vikings will be familiar territory to many primary teachers. For many, therefore, this section of the history curriculum should cause fewer headaches than others. This does not mean, however, that it is all straightforward. This article contains a number of elements that teachers might welcome including a timeline of...

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  • Using 'Development Matters' in the Foundation stage

    Article

    Using ‘Development Matters' to plan learning for history in the Foundation stage You won't find the term history in the Early Years curriculum framework at all. That being so, it can be difficult to know how best to support our Nursery and Reception colleagues when developing historical understanding within the...

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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    Assessment and Progression without levels: where do we go from here? The new Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment...

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