The Middle East

One of the options for study in history is the early Islamic civilisations, particularly Baghdad. In this section, you will find podcasts, articles and resources to develop your knowledge of this curriculum topic and to plan to teach Islamic civilisations.

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  • Trade and pilgrimage in the Abbasid Caliphate

    Article

    The Abbasid Caliphate stretched from North Africa across to Afghanistan and the North West Frontier. Within the caliphate there were movements of people, goods and ideas. The golden period of this early Islamic caliphate was around 900 AD. As the caliphs were building a major trading empire across the Middle...

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  • Scheme of Work: Ancient Sumer

    Article

    Ancient Sumer is often called 'the Cradle of Civilisation'. The Ancient Greeks called it Mesopotamia - the land between two rivers. It is where cities first developed, agriculture began and writing first appeared. One eminent historian records 39 'firsts' for Sumer! Most of this was lost until the 20th century,...

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  • Scheme of Work: Early Islam, including Baghdad

    Article

    Children can be introduced to the idea that people from other civilisations have contributed to many ideas that impact on us still. They can learn about some of the differences in way of life between citizens of Baghdad and London c. AD 900. Links can be made with other cultures...

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  • Podcast Series: The Rise of an Islamic Civilisation

    Multipage Article

    An HA Podcasted History of the Rise of an Islamic Civilisation featuring Dr Caroline Goodson of Birkbeck, University of London.

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  • Trade & Pilgramage in the Early Islamic World

    Article

    This workshop took place at the Historical Association Annual Conference 2015 in Bristol. Investigating trade and pilgrimage in the early Islamic world, Workshop by Karin Doull, University of Roehampton The Abbasid dynasty relocated their capital to Baghdad in the ninth century. The round city of Baghdad, nestled in a bend of the...

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  • Ancient Sumer

    Article

    For many teachers and children alike, Ancient Sumer will be completely new. Although Sumer has always been an option for teaching about Early Civilisations, the fame of Ancient Egypt, as well as being a tried-and-tested topic, has meant that Sumer has perhaps been overlooked. There is little danger of failing...

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  • Early Islamic civilisation

    Article

    The Primary National Curriculum pinpoints Early Islamic Civilisation as Baghdad c. AD 900 - yet it was so much more. For approximately a thousand years after AD 700 there was an extraordinary amount of activity that radiated out from Baghdad and along a glittering crescent through North Africa and into...

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  • Curriculum Planning: which non-European society might we offer at school?

    Article

    A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - one study. chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300. That's quite clear then - there's a choice between early Islam, Central America or...

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  • Curriculum Planning: World Study

    Article

    ‘A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.' That's quite clear then - there's a choice between early Islam, Central America or...

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  • Podcast Series: The Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates

    Multipage Article

    In this set of podcasts Emeritus Professor Gerald Hawting of SOAS, University of London provides an introduction to the Umayyad (661-750) and Abbasid (750-1258) Caliphates.

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  • Long ago or far away: the Global perspective

    Article

    Introduction Even an inclusive national history curriculum can make Britain (and Europe) appear as the lynchpin of world history. Without a coherent structure for global history, young people remain unaware that continents beyond Europe have histories of equal significance. This article suggests ways children can explore how sophisticated human societies...

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  • Getting Year 7 to set their own questions about the Islamic Empire, 600-1600

    Article

    Sometimes particular problems can lead to unexpected solutions. In this case, Sally Burnham decided to solve a problem that she had identified among her Year 12 students by changing the way in which she teaches Year 7. Her Year 12s were finding it difficult to set appropriate questions for their...

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