Individuals & Events

Of course, individuals and events permeate history. However, the Key Stage 1 units of study particularly require the study of significant individuals and events. What makes an individual significant? What might be considered a significant event? The emphasis is upon a comparison of individuals and events that can be used to make links across time, themes and geographical space. In this section you will find resources and articles to help you to plan innovative units of work based around individuals and events that can either be used to reveal a local, national and international picture, or that can be used to illustrate themes over time or geographical space.

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  • Teaching about the Kindertransport without the Kinder

    Article

    The Kindertransport, literally ‘children’s transport’, was the rescue operation of almost 10,000 unaccompanied Jewish child refugees to Britain between December 1938 and the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939.  Many of the Kinder (children) regularly share their experiences in primary schools, where their visit is regarded as...

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  • Happy 200th birthday Florence Nightingale!

    Article

    2020 is undoubtedly going to be an important year in the nursing world and is a significant historical anniversary. The World Health Organisation has declared it the ‘Year of the Nurse and Midwife’ in part because Florence Nightingale, the famous ‘Lady with the Lamp’, will be celebrating her 200th birthday...

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  • Scheme of Work: Grace O'Malley

    Article

    This unit encourages pupils to explore the past by examining their ideas about pirates, with particular reference to Grace O’Malley. The key question leads children to consider what are the characteristics of a pirate and to challenge stereotypes in the light of historical enquiry. The key question also leads to...

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  • Teaching sensitive subjects: slavery and Britain’s role in the trade

    Article

    See also: Teaching Slavery - HA guide Slavery in Britain Sarah Forbes Bonetta - scheme of work Teaching Emotive and Controversial History Diversity guidance for primary teachers and subject leaders Slavery is a part of our history, and its impact can be seen in the statues of influential men, the...

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  • Historical anniversaries calendar

    Article

    This resource is free to everyone. For access to hundreds of other high-quality history and education resources along with free or discounted CPD and membership of a thriving community of teachers and subject leaders, join the Historical Association today  Historical anniversaries can be a great way to get children and young people interested...

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  • Up Pompeii: studying a significant event at Key Stage 1

    Article

    ‘The ashes now began to fall upon us, though in no great quantity. I looked back; a dense dark mist seemed to be following us, spreading itself over the country like a cloud … We had scarcely sat down when night came upon us not such as we have when...

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  • The history of medicine – warts and all – for Key Stage 2

    Article

    The story of the history of medicine is HUGE! In fact, it’s a story within story within a story… You only have to note the substantial amounts that have been written on the subject in the past, to realise that this is a story that could baffle and perplex even...

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  • Pull-out Posters: Primary History 81

    Article

    1. What was it like to be a child in World War II? 2. Three female pilots - can you use the words in the box to talk about each pilot?

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  • Three first-class ladies – teaching significant individuals in Key Stage 1

    Article

    The turn of the 20th century was in many ways a golden age of aviation. In 1903 the Wright brothers conquered heavier-than-air flight. From that time onward there were many other visionaries who wanted to be part of the dream of flying. The topic of early aviation history is an...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: A slightly different view of remembrance

    Article

    The principle of this assembly is to show that positive events and developments can occur in the worst times and events of human history. To begin with, it is vital to ensure that the children (and staff!) know and understand that the First World War was not a good thing for...

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  • To boldly go: exploring the explorers

    Article

    Exploration and a curiosity about the world are key human characteristics that have shaped and continue to shape our behaviour. Nowhere is this more true than with younger children who relish the opportunity to investigate their environment and all it contains. Promoting this natural curiosity and introducing stimulating challenge should...

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  • Women in parliament since 1918

    Article

    At the 1918 election just one woman, Constance Markievicz, won a seat, in Dublin, for Sinn Fein. She was in prison at the time. At the time, of course, the whole of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. All 73 Sinn Fein MPs refused to take up their seats, and...

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  • How significant is the tragic story of the SS Mendi?

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 Historical anniversaries and events are often in the news, commemorated locally and nationally. I have found that getting the children involved in topics relating to these can really help them feel the importance of their learning, help them to appreciate the past and feel a sense...

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  • For whose God, King and country? Seeing the First World War through South Asian eyes

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 In October 1914 France faced defeat on what would later become the Western Front. If the Germans captured the channel ports then the small British Expeditionary Force (BEF) supporting the French would be cut off from Britain, and the channel ports themselves might be used to launch...

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  • ‘So why did they go into hiding?’ Anne Frank in her historical and social context

    Article

    All too often Anne Frank becomes a symbol, used to show ‘the triumph of hope over evil’, even though she was killed during the Holocaust. Sometimes she is quoted utterly out of context to provide uplifting sentiments, or short phrases with redemptive messages.  What this lesson sets out to do...

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  • How can we use significant anniversaries in our teaching?

    Article

    Anniversaries enable us to draw out the significance of events and circumstances in the past in a number of ways. They can serve as a focus for assemblies, providing an opportunity to draw out work covered in history lessons or deal with topics which are outside what is covered in...

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  • What can you tell about the Maya from a Spanish soldier?

    Article

    This article focuses on the links between the Maya and Europe in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, exploring the impact of the Spanish on the life and times of the Maya, as seen through the eyes of one man – Gonzalo Guerrero, who was shipwrecked off the Yucatan peninsula...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Linking historical events with geography

    Article

    In this edition we highlight some interesting anniversaries that might provide a link with geography, either through maps, ideas about climate change or conservation and protection of wild animals. We hope these anniversaries might inspire some stimulating historical investigations, as well as provoke lots of discussion and debate. Some of...

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  • M&S brings over 130 years of archives into your classroom

    Article

    There is something really magical about making your own discoveries. Investigating something sparked by your own curiosity and using your own skills of observation and deduction to find out more is exciting. Human beings have always wanted to find out about our history and our place in the world –...

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  • ‘It’s a great big ship!’: Teaching the Titanic at Key Stage 1

    Article

    Edith Haisman, a 15-year-old passenger on the Titanic, exclaimed, ‘It’s a great big ship!’ when she first caught sight of it. Similar excitement could be generated among your pupils by incorporating a study of the Titanic into your curriculum. If you are tired of teaching about the Great Fire of...

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