Enquiries

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  • Enquiries

    Information

    A key cornerstone of history is historical enquiry. Quality history provision has historical enquiry at its heart. Through historical enquiry children can be shown how to ask questions, select and evaluate evidence and to make judgments about the past. It can also be a vital way of showing them that...

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  • Scheme of Work: Waterloo and the Age of Revolutions

    Article

    This scheme of work explores the 'Age of Revolutions' period across the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It was written for the Historical Association by Karin Doull. The Napoleonic wars shaped their age: children were threatened with 'Boney' long after he had gone. Images of the time in words...

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  • A trail of garnet and gold: Sri Lanka to Anglo-Saxon England

    Article

    Sri Lankan garnet in Anglo-Saxon graves?  In 2009 news broke of a fabulous hoard of gold and garnet military ornaments unearthed in a Staffordshire field. TV reports mentioned the garnet might have come from Sri Lanka or India, but how could it have got here? I began reading up what used to be called ‘The Dark...

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  • The gall nuts and lapis trail

    Article

    We are used to images of monks copying out texts in a very ornate manner. Books such as the Lindisfarne Gospels still absolutely amaze us with their colour, style and appearance. It must have taken hours and hours to copy out a text like that. But how was it done? And how did the monks make the inks they...

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  • Ideas for Assemblies: Refugee stories

    Article

    An assembly could focus on the achievements of their lives, experiences as child refugees and migrants, and how they overcame their difficulties. Their stories can be compared and contrasted with other refugees, such as children from the Kindertransport and child refugees in Europe today. It is important that children understand the term ‘refugee’...

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  • The Kindertransports: teaching challenging history at Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3

    Article

    This workshop took place at the HA Annual Conference May 2017 in Manchester. James Griffiths, National Holocaust Centre and Museum Through exploring the experiences of German Jewish children who grew up under the Nazi regime and left on the Kindertransports children can develop their historical knowledge of the period from...

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  • Number, shape and theory in the historic world

    Article

    This workshop took place at the HA Annual Conference May 2017 in Manchester. Karin Doull, University of RoehamptonApplying mathematical skills to develop historical understanding. This workshop investigates how maths can be used within the study of history to develop skills and enhance understanding. We consider how maths can be used...

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  • Making sense of the Maya - an enquiry planned with skills and concepts in mind

    Article

    This workshop took place at the HA Annual Conference May 2017 in Manchester. Alf Wilkinson, Consultant and Author The Maya is a very popular option for the non-European unit. This session focuses on an enquiry-led investigation into aspects of Maya life, starting from history skills and concepts, rather than content.

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  • Bringing the Civil War to life in Somerset

    Article

    As a lecturer in education teaching humanities at Plymouth University, I spend my time encouraging student teachers to move away from writing lesson plans with a focus on research and recording, to creating lessons that are dynamic – engaging children in historical activities to develop a passion for history. Student...

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  • Making the most of the post-1066 unit

    Article

    Making the most of the post-1066 unit: looking at continuity and change over 10,000 years Introduction The ‘aspect or theme of British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066’ unit is designed to extend the period of study beyond 1066 to help pupils develop a coherent picture of British ...

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  • Teaching pre-history outside the classroom

    Article

    From a visit to a local museum or heritage site, to using bushcraft skills to give pupils first-hand experience of what it might have been like to live in ancient times, teaching prehistory outside the classroom can really give this area of the curriculum the wow factor. The inclusion of...

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  • What confuses primary children in history...

    Article

    Young children who automatically see shiny things as new no matter what their age, those who mix up technology from one age with another, those who dismiss people in the past as stupid because they did not have the possessions we have today, those who equate the age of a...

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  • HA Enquiry Toolkit

    Article

    An enquiry approach is becoming more popular for teaching many primary curriculum subjects. However, enquiry has always been the backbone of good history teaching. Knowing what constitutes a good historical enquiry and how to build one that will enable your pupils to get better at history is not as easy...

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  • Learning Outside the Classroom

    Article

    In recent times, it is easy to recognize that there has been a general move towards promoting outside activities across all manner of organizations and groups. For instance, organisations such as The National Trust and Ordnance Survey are keen to promote outdoor experiences in their literature. An online presence advocates...

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  • Teaching the First World War in the primary school

    Article

    The current commemorations of the First World War have opened the door to some real opportunities for those teaching primary history – perhaps even considering taking children to the battlefields. Although this is customarily a secondary-school experience, this article outlines the opportunities for primary-age children. The suggestions here are based...

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  • Anglo-Saxon Women

    Article

    The Anglo-Saxon era is a diverse period that stretches across just over 650 years. Those we call Anglo-Saxons were not homogenous nor were their experiences. In AD 410 the Roman legions leave and the first Anglo- Saxon raiders appear. These pagan warrior bands would come to terrorise Romano-British settlements until,...

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  • Local history and a sense of identity

    Article

    The history co-ordinator often finds some real challenges as well as opportunities in addressing local history in primary schools. The advantages are well rehearsed – making history relevant to the lives of the children and giving them an improved sense of identity and place through engagement with the ‘real thing’....

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  • Mummified cat embalmed in linen cloth

    Article

    For hundreds of years, travellers to Egypt have marvelled at the amazing monuments evident throughout the country. The treasures of Ancient Egypt became more fascinating after  the discovery of the Rosetta stone in 1799, which led to the deciphering of the hieroglyphic language. Many Victorian explorers returned to their European...

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  • Studying the Maya

    Article

    Most pupils like history, but some struggle with aspects of reading and writing – how can we make history more accessible? This article explores some ways I have found useful in engaging pupils of all abilities. It will focus on activities that might be used in studying the Non-European Society...

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  • What made Cleopatra so special?

    Article

    Ancient Egyptian civilisation is rich and mysterious with distinctive visual imagery and strange animal-headed gods. The exotic differences of the society have always intrigued the western imagination and so they continue to ensure that this is a popular unit with both teachers and children. There are plentiful resources with new...

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