History news

  • Bosworth Battlefield under threat

    30th October 2018

    It was the Battle at Bosworth that brought an end to the War of the Roses. Richard III was defeated by Henry Tudor, ushering in a new dynasty to the monarchy of England and Wales. In recent years the battlefield at Bosworth has been investigated with archaeological excavations and new...

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  • Norwegian Viking ship burial found only half a metre below ground

    28th October 2018

    Archaeologists using hi-res motorised ground-penetrating radar have recently detected a well-preserved Viking ship burial, lying just 50cm below topsoil in farmland in south-east Norway. The ship’s 20-metre keel and timbers represent the fourth intact ship burial so far discovered in Norway. It is remarkable that this one has survived, because...

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  • National Archives to illuminate 1920s Britain with new online resource

    2nd October 2018

    The UK National Archives have posted online an array of fascinating documents and pictures illuminating the history of the 1920s, a decade that saw enormous changes in British society. The new resouce makes available 67 letters, cartoons, photographs, official documents and handwritten notes covering the General Strike, hunger marches and unemployment, the...

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  • Black History Month 2018

    2nd October 2018

    In the UK October is Black History Month – a few weeks of the year when men and women of colour are featured in classrooms and beyond. Is this to raise awareness of the diversity of the people of the past, or of people now, or the diversity around us...

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  • Archaeologists discover buried Roman village in Alderney

    31st August 2018

    Excavations in Alderney have uncovered what looks to be the largest and oldest Roman settlement yet found in the Channel Islands, buried beneath sand in what is now Longis Common. Dating back to the 2nd Century BC and possibly covering an area of up to 5,000 square metres, the village was...

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  • Report on the Historical Association Tour of Cardiff and its environs

    31st August 2018

    Twenty-three  people met in the comfortable Clayton Hotel in central Cardiff in June to attempt to assimilate two thousand years of Welsh history in a week. We were blessed with a heatwave, a bustling city environment, and a lot to see. We started on the eastern edge of South Wales...

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  • The Historian 138: Out now

    23rd August 2018

    We are drawing towards the close of the First World War centenary. This November there will be lots of stories in the media about that period. We wanted to get some of our coverage done early – partly before you all get bogged down with an overload, but also to...

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  • New research sheds light on downfall of Classic Maya civilisation

    3rd August 2018

    The Maya was one of the world’s greatest ancient civilisations, and its apparently sudden decline in the 9th century AD has long been a subject for historical debate.   Now scientists have found evidence which appears to confirm the theory that the large-scale abandonment of Maya city states was precipitated by a massive drought...

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  • Photo archive reveals healthcare before the NHS

    5th July 2018

    A fascinating collection of more than 4,000 photographs uncovered in the Historic England Archive is giving up its secrets after more than 70 years and is now accessible to the public.  Staff at Historic England’s Archive in Swindon recently discovered 4,050 black and white photographic prints taken by the Topical...

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  • HA Awards Evening 2018

    5th July 2018

    At the end of a sweltering June the Historical Association gathered in London for our annual awards evening. Each year this wonderful event is an opportunity to celebrate some of the people that make history happen across the country on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. For 2018 as the...

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