The Tudors

A popular unit of study in Key Stage 2 has in the past been the Tudors. It is possible to continue to study the Tudors through either a local study or through a unit of study beyond 1066, although the emphasis now shifts to the Tudors representing a turning point. Given that this period saw the Reformation, 6 wives and the first female queen ruling in her own right, turning points are not difficult to find. In this section, you will find articles and resources to help you to plan to teach the Tudor period as a local study or turning point. 

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  • Local significant individuals

    Multipage Article

    The National Curriculum specifies a local study both at Key Stages 1 and 2. Basing your local study around an individual is a great way to bring the heritage of your locality to life. Many of these individuals are part of larger national events and changes and seeing these changes at...

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  • Primary Scheme of Work: The Elizabethans

    Article

    This unit provides children the opportunity to look at Elizabethan times as an aspect of British history that extends pupils' chronological knowledge beyond 1066. This unit is supported by the following: Bracey, P. (2015) The Elizabethans. All Banquets and fun? The Historical Association’s Scheme of Work for Primary History. The Historical...

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  • Scheme of Work: Grace O'Malley

    Article

    This unit encourages pupils to explore the past by examining their ideas about pirates, with particular reference to Grace O’Malley. The key question leads children to consider what are the characteristics of a pirate and to challenge stereotypes in the light of historical enquiry. The key question also leads to...

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  • Elizabethan times: Just banquets and fun?

    Article

    Although much of the Key Stage 2 history curriculum relates to the period before 1066, we are expected to include 'a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066' (DfE, 2013,p.5) This raises two questions:a) How can a post-1066 topic be related...

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  • Strange goings-on: exploring the benefits of learning history through outdoor pedagogy

    Article

    Learning history outside the classroom has tremendous benefits. This article looks at one such example where children can get an immersive, residential historical experience. This not only provides a memorable learning experience, but the combination of an evocative setting, together with carefully crafted activities taught using an outdoor pedagogy, allows...

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  • Using museum and heritage sites to promote higher-level learning at KS2

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 The Key Stage 2 Primary History Curriculum sets ambitious challenges for pupils: "…They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should...

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  • Why stop at the Tudors?

    Article

    Article from Primary History 79 When deciding to teach the topic of Benin to my Year 5 pupils I was somewhat daunted by the fact that I had never taught it before, and I was determined that it be a meaningful experience which benefited their narrative, chronological and historical skills-based understanding of...

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  • Using Horrible History to develop primary literacy and history

    Article

    When I started planning for my Key Stage 2 literacy lessons last year, I wanted to link them to my history topic, the Tudors, and I also needed them to cover a significant amount of non-fiction English objectives, having focused on fiction and poetry texts in the previous term. One...

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  • Poverty in Britain: A development study for Key Stage 2

    Article

    One of the requirements for Key Stage 2 history is for some history that extends beyond 1066. Various suggestions have been made including an examination of change within a social theme. The example given is Crime and Punishment but the opportunities for something interesting are vast. This article focuses on...

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  • Podcast Series: William I to Henry VII

    Multipage Article

    An HA Podcasted History featuring Professor David Bates and Professor Nicholas Vincent of the University of East Anglia, Dr Philip Morgan of Keele University, Professor Mark Ormrod of the University of York, Dr James Davis of Queens University Belfast, Professor Michael Hicks of the University of Winchester, Dr Sean Cunningham of...

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  • A living timeline

    Article

    The problem Pupils' background knowledge - Tudors and Victorians Here at Knebworth House, primary school children visit us to enhance their learning of both the Tudors and the Victorians, in particular; both are popular periods to study within the primary curriculum and both have special significance for us at Knebworth....

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  • Visual Literacy: Learning through pictures and images

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the current National Curriculum and some content and references are outdated. What questions does the portrait raise in your mind? What messages does the artist intend to convey? How does the artist convey those messages to the intended audience? What might have been the circumstances under which the...

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  • Grace O' Malley, alias Granuaile, pirate & politician, c. 1530-1603

    Article

    The Northamptonshire Inspection & Advisory Service (NIAS) can confirm Paul Bracey’s view of the way Ireland’s rich stories help to provide a ‘sounder map of the past’ and increase ‘choice, range and fun in our teaching’. (see pages 6-8) At Naseby CE Primary School the excited curiosity of Years 1...

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  • Britain and the wider world in Tudor times

    Article

    The first two articles in this series introduced three generic principles which might underpin planning a scheme of work in the KS2 History Curriculum. Article 1 (Jan 2001) drew on contemporary history to analyse and explain the principles. Article 2 (May 2001) was based mainly on material from the Victorian...

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  • The Plague in Cumberland 1597-1598. Some documents used in the Cumbria Record Office (Carlisle) by Key Stage 2 pupils studying the Tudors

    Article

    Outbreaks of the plague were common in the 16th century and the north of England was badly affected in the 1590s. It is believed that the plague arrived in Cumberland from Newcastle about Michaelmas 1597 and continued for over a year. The only places for which documentation exists are the...

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