Found 469 results matching 'nuffield'

Not found what you’re looking for? Try using double quote marks to search for a specific whole word or phrase, try a different search filter on the left, or see our search tips.

  • Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England

      Article
    To booke and pen: Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England As a student in the early 1970s, I became acutely aware that formal provision for women's education was a relatively recent development. I was at Bedford College, which originated in 1849 as the first higher education institution...
    Women, education and literacy in Tudor and Stuart England
  • My Favourite History Place: Sutton Hoo

      Article
    A Secret Uncovered, A Mystery Unsolved Sutton Hoo is a sandy heathland overlooking the estuary of the River Deben in Suffolk. In Old English a ‘hoo' is a promontory, ‘sutton' is southern, and ‘tun' is a settlement. Historians have known for years that the fields were farmed in the Iron...
    My Favourite History Place: Sutton Hoo
  • Year 9 face up to historical difference

      Teaching History article
    How many people does it take to make an Essex man? Year 9 face up to historical difference Teaching her Key Stage 3 students in Essex, Catherine McCrory was struck by the stark contrast between their enthusiasm for studying diverse histories of Africa and the Americas and their reluctance to...
    Year 9 face up to historical difference
  • History is literacy: 'doing history' with written and printed sources

      Primary History article
    Introduction: English, Literacy & History - The Bullock Report In 1975 the British government published a very great and wise man, Lord Bullock's report, on the teaching of English. Lord Bullock, a world-class historian, worked closely and intensely with distinguished figures in the teaching of English [literacy]. Lord Bullock, with...
    History is literacy: 'doing history' with written and printed sources
  • Cathars and Castles in Medieval France

      Article
    Almost exactly 800 years ago, in September 1213, a decisive battle was fought at Muret, about ten miles south-west of Toulouse. King Peter II of Aragon, fighting with southern allies from Toulouse and elsewhere, faced an army largely made up of northern French crusaders who had invaded the region at the...
    Cathars and Castles in Medieval France
  • History 326

      The Journal of the Historical Association
    Articles1. Disraeli, Derby and the Suez Canal, 1875: Some Myths Reassessed (pages 182-203) - Geoffrey Hicks2. Labour Identities of the Coalfield: The General Election of 1931 in County Durham (pages 204-229) Hester Barron3. Living Up to Lenin: Leadership Culture and the Spanish Communist Party, 1920-1939 (pages 230-255) - Tim Rees4....
    History 326
  • Case Study: The history club

      Primary History article
    Editorial note: this is an introductory article on the History Club concept: Primary History 64, summer 2013, on History and the new 2014+ National Curriculum for History will provide a vade mecum for schools to develop their own History Clubs. .... sometimes we use the past and today, modern times,...
    Case Study: The history club
  • Case Study: Promoting creativity, empathy and historical imagination

      Article
    Empathy and Imagination Creativity, imagination and historical empathy are concepts with different meanings although interrelated in the field of historical learning (Lee, 1984; Shemilt, 1984, Ashby & Lee, 1987). According to Lee (1984) concepts such as empathy, understanding and imagination are connected in complex ways in history. Lee discusses the...
    Case Study: Promoting creativity, empathy and historical imagination
  • How damaging to the Nazis was the Shetland Bus between 1940 and 1944?

      Article
    The Shetland Bus operation may be considered successful in that it supplied Norwegian resistance movements with weapons and took many refugees from Norway to Shetland, and that it managed to bind just shy of 300,000 German troops in Norway. However, because of this operation, forty-four men lost their lives, and...
    How damaging to the Nazis was the Shetland Bus between 1940 and 1944?
  • Chronology through ICT

      Primary History article
    Introduction: Research into chronological understanding Chronological understanding is both one of history's most important disciplinary organising concepts (Lee and Shemilt: 2004) required for developing a full understanding of history, and certainly one of the most researched, though often with a broader remit that just historical understanding. It is possible to sympathise...
    Chronology through ICT
  • ICT and Students with Special Educational Needs

      Primary History article
    Turner writing in 1998 acknowledged that there was insufficient research into teaching history to pupils with SEN. He believed that this was one reason why there was little to challenge Wilson's declaration that ‘history as the term is generally understood, cannot be taught to these [ESN-S] children' (1998, p.4). This...
    ICT and Students with Special Educational Needs
  • Exeter Branch History

      Branch History
    A Brief History of the Exeter BranchExeter was one of the seventeen pre-First World War branches, founded in November 1906, the same year as the Historical Association itself. The Exeter branch was founded by Professor Walter (W.J.) Harte who became President of the (national) Historical Association 1932-36. Harte was appointed...
    Exeter Branch History
  • The River Don Engine

      Article
    Sarah Walters explores The River Don Engine - her favourite history place. The River Don Engine, though strictly an object, is almost big enough to be labelled as a place in its own right. It certainly needs its own high-ceilinged museum annex and it is in this room that I...
    The River Don Engine
  • Teaching History 148: Chattering Classes

      The HA's journal for secondary history teachers
    02 Editorial 03 HA Secondary News 04 HA update 08 Richard Kerridge and Sacha Cinnamond - Talking with the ‘enemy': firing enthusiasm for history through international conversation and collaboration (Read article) 16 Triumphs Show 1: Collaborating to commemorate Olaudah Equiano - Dan Lyndon and Donald Cumming (Read article) 18 Keeley Richards -...
    Teaching History 148: Chattering Classes
  • Firing enthusiasm for history through international conversation

      Article
    Richard Kerridge and Sacha Cinnamond explain how their history department built a culture of international dialogue and collaboration that enriches their students' historical learning. Videoconferencing is at the centre of these activities. Their story begins with an initial, moving encounter with the First World War battlefields that soon turned into...
    Firing enthusiasm for history through international conversation
  • HA Branches in Yorkshire and the Humber

      Branch details by region
    Hull & East Riding Branch Meetings start at 7.30pm at The Danish Church, Osborne St, Hull HU2 2PN unless otherwise stated in the programme. For more information please contact the Programme Secretary on usher@usher.karoo.co.uk  Hull & East Riding Branch Programme   Sheffield Branch For further details about Sheffield Branch meetings, please contact...
    HA Branches in Yorkshire and the Humber
  • The Institute of Historical Research

      Public History Podcast
    The following podcasts are from an interview between Dr Andrew Foster, chair of our Public History Committee with Professor Miles Taylor, Director of the Institute of Historical Research. The podcasts look at the work of the IHR - what it aims to do for the historical profession and wider public, the...
    The Institute of Historical Research
  • Time and chronology: conjoined twins or distant cousins?

      Teaching History article
    Weaknesses in pupils' grasp of historical chronology are a commonplace in popular discussion of the state of history education. However, as Blow, Lee and Shemilt argue, although undoubtedly necessary and fundamental, mastery of chronological conventions is not sufficient: the difficulties that pupils experience when learning history are conceptual, as much...
    Time and chronology: conjoined twins or distant cousins?
  • Polychronicon 146: Interpreting the history of 'big history'

      Article
    In recent decades, a novel approach to history has emerged, called ‘big history', which provides an overview of all of human history, embedded within biological, geological and astronomical history covering the grandest sweep of time and space, from the beginning of the universe to life on Earth here and now....
    Polychronicon 146: Interpreting the history of 'big history'
  • History Painting in England: Benjamin West, Philip James de Loutherbourg, J.M.W. Turner

      Article
    History Painting is defined in Grove's Dictionary of Art as the ‘depiction of several persons engaged in an important or memorable action, usually taken from a written source.' Though History Painters as important as Rubens and Van Dyke worked - in Van Dyke's case for nine years - in England,...
    History Painting in England: Benjamin West, Philip James de Loutherbourg, J.M.W. Turner
  • HA Secondary History Survey 2009

      HA Survey
    Pupils are receiving fewer and fewer hours of history teaching across secondary schools in England according to research by the Historical Association. The specially commissioned report discovered that:Many children receive little or no history education after only two years of secondary school48% of academies report 11-12 year olds spend less...
    HA Secondary History Survey 2009
  • Out and about in Martinsthorpe: a walk in the country

      Visits
    History is nothing if not an exercise in informed imagination. On a country walk in Rutland arranged by a group of (non-historian) friends, I noted that the Ordnance Survey map showed our planned route, following a ridge of high ground separating the valleys of the meandering Gwash and Chater rivers,...
    Out and about in Martinsthorpe: a walk in the country
  • Cyprus: another Middle East issue

      Article
    Although Cyprus, the third largest Mediterranean island, remained nominally under Turkish suzerainty until 1914, the British were established there after the 1878 Congress of Berlin. The idea then was that, from this base, Britain could protect Turkey against threats from Russia, while ensuring that the Turks reformed their treatment of...
    Cyprus: another Middle East issue
  • Neville Chamberlain: Villain or Hero?

      Historian article
    Perhaps no other British figure of the twentieth century has been as vilified or as celebrated as Neville Chamberlain, the British Prime Minister from 1937 to 1940. In 1999, a BBC Radio 4 poll of prominent historians, politicians and commentators rated Chamberlain as one of the worst Prime Ministers of...
    Neville Chamberlain: Villain or Hero?
  • Celebrating Success: Quality Mark

      London Fields Primary School achieves Gold Award Quality Mark
    London Fields is a larger than average primary school situated in Hackney, east London. The school was rated Outstanding by Ofsted in 2011 and again in 2015. The school has a challenging context with free school meals, minority ethnic groups and English as an Additional Language all far in excess...
    Celebrating Success: Quality Mark